Zoology

August 31, 2018 - 3:55 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A prominent shark researcher says smaller, younger great white sharks are being spotted in larger numbers off Cape Cod. Massachusetts marine biologist Greg Skomal says the presence of juvenile sharks could be contributing to more encounters with humans because the young sharks tend to...
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FILE - In this July 21, 2016 file photo, fireflies light up in synchronized bursts as photographers take long-exposure pictures, inside Piedra Canteada, a tourist camp cooperatively owned by 42 local families, inside an old-growth forest near the town of Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala state, Mexico. A study released on Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018 in the journal Science Advances, says that fireflies seem to use their lights to tell bats they taste bad. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
August 22, 2018 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fireflies flash not just for sex, but survival, a new study suggests. Scientists wanted to find out if there's more to the lightning bug's signature blinking glow than finding a mate. Some experts had speculated it was a glaring signal to predators, like bats, that fireflies taste...
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August 19, 2018 - 6:07 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Climate change could be to blame for the collapse of bird populations in the desert along the Nevada-California border, scientists said. The number of bird species has fallen by an average of 43 percent over the past century at survey sites across an area larger than New York state...
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This Aug. 11, 2017, photo provided by Cascadia Research shows a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin, in the foreground, swimming next to a melon-headed dolphin near Kauai, Hawaii. Scientists are touting the first sighting of the hybrid off Hawaii. It's also only the third confirmed instance of a wild-born hybrid between species in the Delphinidae family. (Kimberly A. Wood/Cascadia Research via AP)
July 31, 2018 - 2:05 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Scientists are touting the first sighting of a hybrid between a melon-headed whale and a rough-toothed dolphin in the ocean off Hawaii. But don't call it a "wholphin," they say. The melon-headed whale is one of the various species that's called a whale but is technically a dolphin...
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FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2016, file photo, a xoloitzcuintli is shown in the ring during the non-sporting group competition at the140th Westminster Kennel Club dog show, at Madison Square Garden in New York. A new study published Thursday, July 5, 2018, in the journal Science provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans and left little to no trace in modern American dogs. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
July 05, 2018 - 2:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans. An international team of researchers says the only surviving legacy appears to be a cancer that afflicts dogs that arose from the cells of a dog that lived...
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This June 11, 2018 photo provided by the National Park Service shows a mountain lion kitten identified as P-68. This is one of four new mountain lion kittens found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California’s Santa Monica Mountains. They’re the first litter of kittens found in the Simi Hills, a small area of habitat between the Santa Monica and Santa Susana mountains ranges just north of Los Angeles. (National Park Service via AP, File)
June 19, 2018 - 2:14 pm
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) — Four new mountain lion kittens have been found by researchers studying the wild cats living in Southern California's Santa Monica Mountains, wildlife officials announced in video posts Tuesday showing the blue-eyed babies meowing and one feisty one hissing and even...
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This undated photo provided by Rutgers University shows three Longhorned ticks: from left, a fully engorged female, a partial engorged female, and an engorged nymph. A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle of the continent. (Jim Occi/Rutgers University via AP)
June 12, 2018 - 10:12 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle...
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This Sept. 20, 2013 photo provided by the USDA Forest Service shows a southern pine beetle completing metamorphosis into an adult that will attack a pine tree, at Kisatchie National Forest, in Pineville, La. The beetle that has killed millions of acres of pines in southern forests is munching its way north, and new research suggests its tree-killing prowess could be magnified in cooler climes. (Erich Vallery/USDA Forest Service via AP)
June 10, 2018 - 10:24 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A bark beetle that has devastated southern pine forests is moving north as the climate warms, and new research suggests cool weather could amplify its attacks. Dartmouth researchers say cooler fall and winter temperatures in the Northeast arrest the development of southern pine...
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This April 24, 2018 photo provided by Clara do Amaral shows a wood frog in Ohio. In a report released on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, scientists have found that wood frogs, which don’t urinate in the winter, recycle urea _ the main waste in urine _ into useful nitrogen which keeps the small animals alive as they hibernate and freeze, inside and out. It doesn’t warm them up, but protects cells and tissues, even as the amphibian’s heart, brain and bloodstream stop. (Clara do Amaral, Mount St. Joseph University via AP)
May 01, 2018 - 7:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — If you've ever been unable to find a bathroom in a moment of need, you know the gotta-go feeling. That's nothing compared to the wood frog, which doesn't urinate all winter. In Alaska, wood frogs go eight months without peeing. And scientists have now figured out how they do it,...
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FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2009 file photo, a radio transmitter is inserted into a little brown bat in an abandoned mine in Rosendale, N.Y. A 2018 survey of several cave-dwelling bat species in New Hampshire found very few spent their winters in abandoned mines and other locations that were once popular for them during the winter. Biologists said the numbers are the latest indication that the bats have yet to recover from a fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
April 28, 2018 - 10:58 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A new survey of several cave-dwelling bat species in New Hampshire found very few are spending their winters in abandoned mines and other locations once popular for them in winter. The survey of four sites found only 26 bats and only one little brown bat, which was once the...
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