Zoology

This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows a mature northern fur seal standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 7:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location _ a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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September 26, 2019 - 3:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about (topic), The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield,...
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This April 18, 2019, photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a nutria in Merced County, Calif. With $10 million in state funding, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is preparing to deploy new tactics in its efforts to eradicate nutria. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 25, 2019 - 1:20 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots. "Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "...
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This April 18, 2019, photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a nutria in Merced County, Calif. With $10 million in state funding, the Department of Fish and Wildlife is preparing to deploy new tactics in its efforts to eradicate nutria. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 25, 2019 - 1:23 am
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots. "Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — North America's skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970, a comprehensive study shows. The new study focuses on the drop in sheer numbers of birds, not extinctions. The bird population in the United States and Canada was...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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This undated photo provided by the U.S. National Park Service shows a dead seal found on a beach near Kotzebue, Alaska. Federal marine mammal biologists have declared an "unusual mortality event" over the deaths of ice seals off Alaska's northwest coast. The cause of the deaths is not known. The fisheries arm of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the declaration covers ringed, bearded and spotted seals. (Raime Fronstin/National Park Service via AP)
September 12, 2019 - 8:05 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Seals that rely on sea ice off Alaska's northwest coast have been dying at uncommon rates, and federal marine mammal biologists Thursday declared an "unusual mortality event." The cause of death for nearly 300 ringed, bearded and spotted seals since June 1, 2018, is not...
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