Zoology

December 01, 2019 - 10:06 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade. The new studies were both published by University of Maine scientists. They...
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This Nov. 20, 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University shows the skull from a blue whale skeleton being transferred to a trailer after pulling it from Yaquina Bay, Newport, Ore. The carcass of a giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach, Oregon in 2015. It's exceptionally rare to see an intact blue whale carcass wash ashore and the only other documented case happened more than 200 years ago, when the Lewis and Clark expedition noted that they saw Native Americans salvaging edible parts from a blue whale, said Bruce Mate, emeritus director of Oregon State University's Marine Mammal Institute. (Michelle Klampe/Oregon State University via AP)
November 22, 2019 - 8:44 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about...
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This Nov. 5, 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University shows whale bones from a 78-foot blue whale that washed near Gold Beach, Ore. The carcass of the giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday, Nov. 22, 2019. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach in 2015. (Michelle Klampe/Oregon State University via AP)
November 22, 2019 - 8:42 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about...
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This Nov. 5, 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University shows whale bones from a 78-foot blue whale that washed near Gold Beach, Ore. The carcass of the giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday, Nov. 22, 2019. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach in 2015. (Michelle Klampe/Oregon State University via AP)
November 22, 2019 - 8:31 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, file photo, a technician releases mosquitoes that are infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria called "Wolbachia" in the Tubiacanga neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The nonprofit World Mosquito Program infected mosquitoes with that bacteria, called Wolbachia, and released them in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that agreed to be test sites. Researchers say dengue cases fell dramatically, compared to nearby communities where regular mosquitoes did the biting. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)
November 21, 2019 - 4:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that are buzzing with the specially bred...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, file photo, a technician releases mosquitoes that are infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria called "Wolbachia" in the Tubiacanga neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The nonprofit World Mosquito Program infected mosquitoes with that bacteria, called Wolbachia, and released them in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that agreed to be test sites. Researchers say dengue cases fell dramatically, compared to nearby communities where regular mosquitoes did the biting. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)
November 21, 2019 - 4:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that are buzzing with the specially bred...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, file photo, a technician releases mosquitoes that are infected with a dengue-blocking bacteria called "Wolbachia" in the Tubiacanga neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The nonprofit World Mosquito Program infected mosquitoes with that bacteria, called Wolbachia, and released them in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that agreed to be test sites. Researchers say dengue cases fell dramatically, compared to nearby communities where regular mosquitoes did the biting. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)
November 21, 2019 - 4:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They still bite, but new research shows lab-grown mosquitoes are fighting dangerous dengue fever that they normally would spread. Dengue infections appear to be dropping fast in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia that are buzzing with the specially bred...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 7:09 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a side view of a recently emerged adult female western glacier stonefly from below Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Mont. The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the northern Rocky Mountains will be protected as threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials said. (Joe Giersch/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, File)
November 20, 2019 - 6:41 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The continued existence of two species of insects is in doubt because climate change is melting away the glaciers and year-round snowfields they depend on, U.S. wildlife officials said Wednesday. The western glacier stonefly and the meltwater lednian stonefly found in the...
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This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows a mature northern fur seal standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 8:31 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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