Wireless technology

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2012, file photo, a salesperson stands at counters selling mobile phones produced by ZTE Corp. at an appliance store in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province. President Donald Trump said Sunday, May 13, 2018, that he would help a Chinese telecommunications company get "back into business," saying too many jobs in China are stake after the U.S. government cut off access to its American suppliers. At issue is the Commerce Department’s move last month to block the ZTE Corp., a major supplier of telecoms networks and smartphones based in southern China, from importing American components for seven years. (Chinatopix Via AP, File)
May 14, 2018 - 7:56 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a surprising overture to China, President Donald Trump says he would help a Chinese telecommunications company get "back into business," saying too many jobs in China are at stake after the U.S. government cut off access to its American suppliers. The U.S. Commerce Department's...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2012, file photo, a salesperson stands at counters selling mobile phones produced by ZTE Corp. at an appliance store in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province. President Donald Trump said Sunday, May 13, 2018, that he would help a Chinese telecommunications company get "back into business," saying too many jobs in China are stake after the U.S. government cut off access to its American suppliers. At issue is the Commerce Department’s move last month to block the ZTE Corp., a major supplier of telecoms networks and smartphones based in southern China, from importing American components for seven years. (Chinatopix Via AP, File)
May 14, 2018 - 5:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a surprising overture to China, President Donald Trump says he would help a Chinese telecommunications company get "back into business," saying too many jobs in China are at stake after the U.S. government cut off access to its American suppliers. At issue is the Commerce...
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T-Mobile CEO John Legere, left, and Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure pose for photos on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, April 30, 2018. To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
April 30, 2018 - 2:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. The deal announced Sunday would combine the nation's third- and fourth-largest...
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T-Mobile CEO John Legere, left, and Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure pose for photos on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, April 30, 2018. To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
April 30, 2018 - 11:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. The deal announced Sunday would combine the nation's third- and fourth-largest...
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FILE- In this April 27, 2010 file photo, a woman using a cell phone walks past T-Mobile and Sprint stores in New York. T-Mobile and Sprint are trying again to combine in a deal that would reshape the U.S. wireless landscape, the companies announced Sunday, April 29, 2018 (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
April 30, 2018 - 11:04 am
NEW YORK (AP) — To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. The deal announced Sunday would combine the nation's third- and fourth-largest...
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FILE- In this April 27, 2010 file photo, a woman using a cell phone walks past T-Mobile and Sprint stores in New York. T-Mobile and Sprint are trying again to combine in a deal that would reshape the U.S. wireless landscape, the companies announced Sunday, April 29, 2018 (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
April 30, 2018 - 12:02 am
NEW YORK (AP) — To gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T. The deal announced Sunday would combine the nation's third- and fourth-largest...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, file photo shows the AT&T sign at a store in Hialeah, Fla. The Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into whether AT&T, Verizon and a standards-setting group worked together to stop consumers from easily switching wireless carriers. The companies confirmed the inquiry in separate statements late Friday, April 20, 2018, in response to a report in The New York Times. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)
April 20, 2018 - 7:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into whether AT&T, Verizon and a standards-setting group worked together to stop consumers from easily switching wireless carriers. The companies confirmed the inquiry in separate statements late Friday in response to...
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April 20, 2018 - 7:40 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into whether AT&T, Verizon and a standards-setting group worked together to stop consumers from easily switching wireless carriers. The companies confirmed the inquiry in separate statements late Friday in response to...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla. The Department of Homeland Security says it has identified suspected rogue cell tower simulators in Washington. The suspected simulators, known popularly as Stingrays, were detected by a DHS contractor in early 2017 during a 90-day pilot. (U.S. Patent and Trademark Office via AP, File)
April 03, 2018 - 2:33 pm
For the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages. The use of what are known as cellphone-site simulators by...
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FILE- In this April 30, 2015, file photo, a Capitol Hill staffer looks down at papers while on a cell phone while walking inside the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Department of Homeland Security acknowledges detecting suspected cell tower simulators in Washington, D.C. These devices can track specific cell phones and even intercept or divert calls and text messages. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
April 03, 2018 - 2:07 pm
For the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages. The use of such cellphone-site simulators by foreign...
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