Wildfires

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2019, file photo, a helicopter drops water near power lines and electrical towers while working at a fire on San Bruno Mountain near Brisbane, Calif. California’s Pacific Gas & Electric is faced regularly with a no-win choice between risking the start of a deadly wildfire or immiserating millions of paying customers by shutting off the power. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
November 14, 2019 - 9:28 am
The utility that serves more than 5 million electrical customers in one of the world’s most technologically advanced areas is now faced again and again with a no-win decision: risk starting catastrophic deadly wildfires, or turn off the lights and immiserate millions of paying customers. Pacific...
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2019, file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric worker walks in front of a truck in San Francisco. California’s Pacific Gas & Electric is faced regularly with a no-win choice between risking the start of a deadly wildfire or immiserating millions of paying customers by shutting off the power. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
November 14, 2019 - 9:21 am
The utility that serves more than 5 million electrical customers in one of the world’s most technologically advanced areas is now faced again and again with a no-win decision: risk starting catastrophic deadly wildfires, or turn off the lights and immiserate millions of paying customers. Pacific...
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2019, file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric worker walks in front of a truck in San Francisco. California’s Pacific Gas & Electric is faced regularly with a no-win choice between risking the start of a deadly wildfire or immiserating millions of paying customers by shutting off the power. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
November 14, 2019 - 1:09 am
The utility that serves more than 5 million electrical customers in one of the world’s most technologically advanced areas is now faced again and again with a no-win decision: risk starting catastrophic deadly wildfires, or turn off the lights and immiserate millions of paying customers. Pacific...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2019, file photo, a Pacific Gas & Electric worker walks in front of a truck in San Francisco. California’s Pacific Gas & Electric is faced regularly with a no-win choice between risking the start of a deadly wildfire or immiserating millions of paying customers by shutting off the power. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
November 14, 2019 - 1:07 am
California’s Pacific Gas & Electric is faced regularly with a no-win choice between risking the start of a deadly wildfire or immiserating millions of paying customers by shutting of the power. The utility serves more than 5 million electrical customers in one of the world’s most...
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California Public Utilities Commissioner Cliff Rechtschaffen speaks at a CPUC meeting in San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. California regulators will vote Wednesday on whether to open an investigation into pre-emptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state for much of October as strong winds sparked fears of wildfires. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
November 13, 2019 - 10:37 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators opened a formal investigation Wednesday into preemptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state in October, drawing strong rebukes from public officials and residents who said the shut-offs were too broad and poorly executed. The unanimous...
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California Public Utilities Commissioner Cliff Rechtschaffen speaks at a CPUC meeting in San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. California regulators will vote Wednesday on whether to open an investigation into pre-emptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state for much of October as strong winds sparked fears of wildfires. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
November 13, 2019 - 7:45 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators opened a formal investigation Wednesday into preemptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state in October, drawing strong rebukes from public officials and residents who said the shut-offs were too broad and poorly executed. The unanimous...
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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 9, 2018 file photo, a firefighter battles the Woolsey Fire burning a home in Malibu, Calif. A Southern California utility has agreed to pay $360 million to settle lawsuits brought by cities, counties and other public agencies over deadly wildfires sparked by its equipment in the last two years, including one that was later blamed for a mudslide that killed more than 20 people. An attorney for 23 public entities said Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, that Southern California Edison has agreed to the sum to repay taxpayers for firefighting and damage from the Thomas Fire in 2017 and Woolsey Fire last year. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
November 13, 2019 - 5:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Southern California Edison has agreed to pay $360 million to local governments to settle lawsuits over deadly wildfires sparked by its equipment during the last two years, including one blamed for a mudslide that killed more than 20 people, the utility and attorneys announced...
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In this Feb. 29, 2016 photo, Steve Doty, owner of Shady Oak Barrel House, poses for photos in Santa Rosa, Calif. Anger over devastating California wildfires sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric power lines is coming to a head — in a beer. And an outcry is brewing. Doty a new beer called “F--- PG&E,” describing it on Facebook last week as “a classic California pale ale, featuring Cashmere and Simcoe hops and a touch of malt sweetness.” (Christopher Chung/The Press Democrat via AP)
November 13, 2019 - 5:13 pm
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP) — Anger over devastating California wildfires sparked by Pacific Gas & Electric power lines is coming to a head — in a beer. And an outcry is brewing. Steve Doty, owner of Shady Oak brewery in Santa Rosa, announced a new beer called “F--- PG&E,” describing it on...
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November 13, 2019 - 4:27 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Southern California Edison has agreed to pay $360 million to local governments to settle lawsuits over deadly wildfires sparked by its equipment during the last two years, including one blamed for a mudslide that killed more than 20 people, the utility and attorneys announced...
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California Public Utilities Commissioner Cliff Rechtschaffen speaks at a CPUC meeting in San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. California regulators will vote Wednesday on whether to open an investigation into pre-emptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state for much of October as strong winds sparked fears of wildfires. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
November 13, 2019 - 3:34 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators opened a formal investigation Wednesday into pre-emptive power outages that blacked out large parts of the state in October, drawing strong rebukes from public officials and residents who said the shut-offs were too broad and poorly executed. The unanimous...
Read More

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