Whales

File - In this August 2009, file photo, provided by the Department of Defense, a Cook Inlet beluga whale calf, left, and an adult breach near Anchorage, Alaska. Two environmental groups gave formal notice Friday, Jan. 31, 2020, that they will sue to protect endangered Alaska beluga whales from oil and gas operations. The Center for Biological Diversity and Cook Inletkeeper gave notice they will sue the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for violating the Endangered Species Act by not protecting Cook Inlet belugas. Formal 60-day noticed is required before the agency can be sued. (Christopher Garner/Department of Defense via AP, File)
January 31, 2020 - 4:07 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Two environmental groups gave formal notice Friday that they will sue to protect endangered Alaska beluga whales from problems caused by oil and gas operations. The announcement came three days after a federal agency said the population of white whales is declining faster...
Read More
January 28, 2020 - 4:34 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The population of endangered beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet continues to decline, federal marine mammal authorities announced Tuesday. A biennial survey conducted by the fisheries arm of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration estimated the population of...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Guy Runco, director of the Bird Treatment and Learning Center, releases a common murre near the Anchorage small boat harbor in Anchorage, Alaska. Hundreds of thousands of common murres, a fast-flying seabird, died from starvation four winters ago in the North Pacific, and a new research paper attempts to explain why. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File)
January 15, 2020 - 2:06 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Common murres look like skinny penguins but fly like F-15 fighter jets. The North Pacific seabirds can quickly cover hundreds of miles searching for schools of small forage fish. Their powerful wings let them dive more than 150 feet (46 meters) under water to gorge on...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, endangered orcas from the J pod swim in Puget Sound west of Seattle, as seen from a federal research vessel that had been tracking the whales. An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from satellites in space. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 05, 2020 - 6:42 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space. New England Aquarium of Boston and Draper of Cambridge say whale conservation needs new, higher-tech solutions to protect whales from...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, endangered orcas from the J pod swim in Puget Sound west of Seattle, as seen from a federal research vessel that had been tracking the whales. An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from satellites in space. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 05, 2020 - 1:19 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space. New England Aquarium of Boston and Draper of Cambridge say whale conservation needs new, higher-tech solutions to protect whales from...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, endangered orcas from the J pod swim in Puget Sound west of Seattle, as seen from a federal research vessel that had been tracking the whales. An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from satellites in space. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 05, 2020 - 10:59 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space. New England Aquarium of Boston and Draper of Cambridge say whale conservation needs new, higher-tech solutions to protect whales from...
Read More
January 05, 2020 - 9:43 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — An aquarium and an engineering firm in Massachusetts are partnering on a project to better protect whales by monitoring them from space. New England Aquarium of Boston and Draper of Cambridge say whale conservation needs new, higher-tech solutions to protect whales from...
Read More
This image released by Discovery Channel shows Icelandic ocean rower Fiann Paul blowing a horn in a scene from “The Impossible Row," documenting endurance athlete Colin O’Brady and his crew's crossing of the treacherous icy waters of The Drake Passage by row boat. Located between the Southern tip of South America and the edge of Antarctica the Drake Passage is considered one of the most terrifying and dangerous sea paths in the world. They finished crossing the Drake Passage in 13 days. (Discovery Channel via AP)
December 28, 2019 - 10:45 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — As freezing water thrashed their rowboat in some of the most treacherous waters in the world, six men fought for 13 days to make history, becoming the first people to traverse the infamous Drake Passage with nothing other than sheer manpower. They dodged icebergs, held their...
Read More
In this photo taken Dec. 13, 2019, provided by Marine Life Studies Whale Entanglement Team, a young humpback whale entangled in fishing gear is freed in Monterey Bay, Calif., days after it was first spotted by a fisherman. (Marine Life Studies via AP)
December 17, 2019 - 4:35 pm
MOSS LANDING, Calif. (AP) — A rescue team helped free a young humpback whale that was tangled in fishing gear south of San Francisco days after a fisherman first spotted it, a conservation group said Tuesday. The team in a small inflatable boat in Monterey Bay attached five large, hot-pink buoys to...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
Read More

Pages