Welfare of the mentally ill

FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, joined by student Carson Abt, right, and Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., left, bow their heads during the opening prayer of a listening session with high school students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. When shots rang out at a high school in Parkland, Florida last year, leaving 17 people dead, Trump quickly turned his thoughts to the need for more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier this month, Trump again raised the need for “building new facilities” for the mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
August 30, 2019 - 3:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When shots rang out last year at a high school in Parkland, Florida, leaving 17 people dead, President Donald Trump quickly turned his thoughts to creating more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier...
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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, joined by student Carson Abt, right, and Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., left, bow their heads during the opening prayer of a listening session with high school students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. When shots rang out at a high school in Parkland, Florida last year, leaving 17 people dead, Trump quickly turned his thoughts to the need for more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier this month, Trump again raised the need for “building new facilities” for the mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
August 30, 2019 - 10:23 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When shots rang out last year at a high school in Parkland, Florida, leaving 17 people dead, President Donald Trump quickly turned his thoughts to creating more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier...
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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, joined by student Carson Abt, right, and Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., left, bow their heads during the opening prayer of a listening session with high school students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. When shots rang out at a high school in Parkland, Florida last year, leaving 17 people dead, Trump quickly turned his thoughts to the need for more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier this month, Trump again raised the need for “building new facilities” for the mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
August 30, 2019 - 6:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When shots rang out last year at a high school in Parkland, Florida, leaving 17 people dead, President Donald Trump quickly turned his thoughts to creating more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier...
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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump, joined by student Carson Abt, right, and Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., left, bow their heads during the opening prayer of a listening session with high school students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. When shots rang out at a high school in Parkland, Florida last year, leaving 17 people dead, Trump quickly turned his thoughts to the need for more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier this month, Trump again raised the need for “building new facilities” for the mentally ill as a way to prevent mass shootings. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
August 30, 2019 - 4:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When shots rang out last year at a high school in Parkland, Florida, leaving 17 people dead, President Donald Trump quickly turned his thoughts to creating more mental institutions. When back-to-back mass shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, jolted the nation earlier...
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FILE - This file booking photo provided by the Story County Jail in Nevada, Iowa, shows Collin Richards. Richards, who killed a former Iowa State University golfer has been sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. A Story County judge pronounced the mandatory sentence on Friday, Aug. 23, 2019. He'd pleaded guilty on June 14 to first-degree murder for the Sept. 17 slaying of 22-year-old Celia Barquin Arozamena. (Story County (Iowa) Jail via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 12:45 pm
AMES, Iowa (AP) — The man who fatally stabbed a former Iowa State University golfer from Spain while she was playing a round near the school was sentenced Friday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Collin Richards pleaded guilty on June 14 to first-degree murder in the Sept. 17...
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FILE - This file booking photo provided by the Story County Jail in Nevada, Iowa, shows Collin Richards. Richards, who killed a former Iowa State University golfer has been sentenced to life in prison without possibility of parole. A Story County judge pronounced the mandatory sentence on Friday, Aug. 23, 2019. He'd pleaded guilty on June 14 to first-degree murder for the Sept. 17 slaying of 22-year-old Celia Barquin Arozamena. (Story County (Iowa) Jail via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 11:25 am
AMES, Iowa (AP) — The man who fatally stabbed a former Iowa State University golfer from Spain while she was playing a round near the school was sentenced Friday to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Collin Richards pleaded guilty on June 14 to first-degree murder in the Sept. 17...
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An Albany County probation official on Monday, Aug. 5, 2019, holds up a tablet used to conduct the e-Connect program, at the Albany County Probation Department office. The project screens young offenders for risk of suicide as a way to connect them with mental health services. (AP Photo/Ryan Terinelli)
August 12, 2019 - 5:19 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Probation departments across New York have started screening young offenders for risk of suicide as a way to connect them with mental health services. Ten counties in upstate New York are participating in the program developed by researchers at Columbia University. The project,...
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Gloria Garces kneels in front of crosses at a makeshift memorial near the scene of a mass shooting at a shopping complex Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, in El Paso, Texas. The border city jolted by a weekend massacre at a Walmart absorbed more grief Monday as the death toll climbed and prepared for a visit from President Donald Trump over anger from El Paso residents and local Democratic leaders who say he isn't welcome and should stay away. (AP Photo/John Locher)
August 06, 2019 - 2:09 pm
EL PASO, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas (all times local): 12 p.m. A Texas congresswoman says victims' families are already using an El Paso community center that was opened to help people cope following last weekend's mass shooting at a Walmart...
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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio. A masked gunman in body armor opened fire early Sunday in the popular entertainment district in Dayton, killing several people, including his sister, and wounding dozens before he was quickly slain by police, officials said. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
August 06, 2019 - 8:06 am
DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Facing pressure to take action after the latest mass shooting in the U.S., Ohio's Republican governor plans to outline his proposals designed to deal with gun violence and mental health. Gov. Mike DeWine said he'll discuss those ideas in detail on Tuesday, a little more than a...
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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, left, speaks alongside Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, right, during a vigil at the scene of a mass shooting, Sunday, Aug. 4, 2019, in Dayton, Ohio. A masked gunman in body armor opened fire early Sunday in the popular entertainment district in Dayton, killing several people, including his sister, and wounding dozens before he was quickly slain by police, officials said. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
August 06, 2019 - 7:24 am
DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Facing pressure to take action after the latest mass shooting in the U.S., Ohio's Republican governor plans to outline his proposals designed to deal with gun violence and mental health. Gov. Mike DeWine said he'll discuss those ideas in detail on Tuesday, a little more than a...
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