Weather

Two unstable cranes loom over the construction of a Hard Rock Hotel, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in New Orleans. The 18-story hotel project that was under construction collapsed last Saturday, killing three workers. Two bodies remain in the wreckage. Authorities say explosives will be strategically placed on the two unstable construction cranes in hopes of bringing them down with a series of small controlled blasts ahead of approaching tropical weather. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 18, 2019 - 12:01 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Plans have been pushed back a day to bring down two giant, unstable construction cranes in a series of controlled explosions before they can topple onto historic New Orleans buildings, the city's fire chief said Friday, noting the risky work involved in placing explosive on the...
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Two unstable cranes loom over the construction of a Hard Rock Hotel, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in New Orleans. The 18-story hotel project that was under construction collapsed last Saturday, killing three workers. Two bodies remain in the wreckage. Authorities say explosives will be strategically placed on the two unstable construction cranes in hopes of bringing them down with a series of small controlled blasts ahead of approaching tropical weather. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 18, 2019 - 7:06 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The city of New Orleans is preparing to explode two giant, badly damaged construction cranes that are towering over a partially collapsed hotel project at the edge of the French Quarter, bringing them down Friday just ahead of tropical weather that could possibly cause them to...
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Two unstable cranes loom over the construction of a Hard Rock Hotel, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in New Orleans. The 18-story hotel project that was under construction collapsed last Saturday, killing three workers. Two bodies remain in the wreckage. Authorities say explosives will be strategically placed on the two unstable construction cranes in hopes of bringing them down with a series of small controlled blasts ahead of approaching tropical weather. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 18, 2019 - 6:53 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The city of New Orleans is preparing to explode two giant, badly damaged construction cranes that are towering over a partially collapsed hotel project. They hope to demolish the cranes Friday with a series of controlled explosions that would drop them straight down without...
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October 18, 2019 - 5:16 am
ISLAMABAD (AP) — A plane carrying Britain's Prince William and wife Kate has safely landed in Pakistan's capital of Islamabad, hours after two failed landing attempts in bad weather forced them to fly back to the eastern city of Lahore. The delay meant the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge had to...
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WBEN Newsroom
October 18, 2019 - 12:37 am
Buffalo, N.Y. (WBEN) - Another sure sign of Fall as a Frost Advisory is posted for most of Western New York overnight Friday into Saturday. Temperatures will dip to the low to mid 30's overnight. Frost is expected across much of the region and vegetation will be at risk. FROST ADVISORY IN EFFECT...
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This Oct. 15, 2019 photo shows corn fields in Lyons, S.D., which contain areas of water-logged soil preventing harvest. (Erin Bormett/The Argus Leader via AP)
October 17, 2019 - 4:53 pm
FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Many farmers in the Midwest and South whose planting this year was interrupted by wet weather are getting a reprieve, though a few Northern states have seen harvest prospects go from bad to worse. Minnesota and the Dakotas have seen snow and rain in recent weeks that have...
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A house is trapped under a tree that toppled from strong winds, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in Danvers, Mass. (Nic Antaya/The Boston Globe via AP)
October 17, 2019 - 1:17 pm
BOSTON (AP) — A record-breaking autumn storm plunged hundreds of thousands of people into the dark, toppled trees, canceled schools and delayed trains in the Northeast, while persistent winds Thursday hampered efforts to clean up and restore power. The nor'easter brought high winds and rain to the...
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Concerned residents try to stabilize the 55-foot sailboat Fearless, which was damaged after it washed into a wharf in Mattapoisett harbor due to strong overnight winds, Thursday morning, Oct. 17, 2019, in Mattapoisett, Mass. ( Peter Pereira/Standard Times via AP)
October 17, 2019 - 11:08 am
BOSTON (AP) — A powerful autumn storm plunged hundreds of thousands of people into the dark, toppled trees, canceled schools and delayed trains Thursday in the Northeast. The nor'easter brought high winds and rain to the region Wednesday and Thursday. In Massachusetts, wind gusts reached as high as...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011 NOAA satellite image shows Hurricane Irene, a category 2 storm with winds up to 100 mph and located about 400 miles southeast of Nassau. According to a study published Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists have discovered a real life mash-up of two feared disasters _ hurricanes and earthquakes _ called “stormquakes.” It’s a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor’easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. It’s a fairly common natural occurrence that wasn’t noticed before because it was in the seismic background noise. (Weather Underground via AP)
October 16, 2019 - 4:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes — and they're calling them "stormquakes." The shaking of the sea floor during hurricanes and nor'easters can rumble like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake and can last for days, according to a study...
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FILE - This Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011 NOAA satellite image shows Hurricane Irene, a category 2 storm with winds up to 100 mph and located about 400 miles southeast of Nassau. According to a study published Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists have discovered a real life mash-up of two feared disasters _ hurricanes and earthquakes _ called “stormquakes.” It’s a shaking of the sea floor during a hurricane or nor’easter that rumbles like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake. It’s a fairly common natural occurrence that wasn’t noticed before because it was in the seismic background noise. (Weather Underground via AP)
October 16, 2019 - 4:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have discovered a mash-up of two feared disasters — hurricanes and earthquakes — and they're calling them "stormquakes." The shaking of the sea floor during hurricanes and nor'easters can rumble like a magnitude 3.5 earthquake and can last for days, according to a study...
Read More

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