Weapons of mass destruction

In this March 14, 2019, photo, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan goes before the Senate Armed Services Committee to discuss the Department of Defense budget, on Capitol Hill in Washington. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 16, 2019 - 10:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
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In this March 14, 2019, photo, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan goes before the Senate Armed Services Committee to discuss the Department of Defense budget, on Capitol Hill in Washington. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 16, 2019 - 9:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
Read More
In this March 4, 2019, photo, military delegates leave after a meeting one day before the opening session of China's National People's Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
March 16, 2019 - 5:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
Read More
In this March 4, 2019, photo, military delegates leave after a meeting one day before the opening session of China's National People's Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
March 16, 2019 - 3:39 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
Read More
In this March 4, 2019, photo, military delegates leave after a meeting one day before the opening session of China's National People's Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
March 16, 2019 - 1:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
Read More
In this March 14, 2019, photo, acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan goes before the Senate Armed Services Committee to discuss the Department of Defense budget, on Capitol Hill in Washington. To a remarkable degree, the Pentagon’s new budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Shanahan has summarized in three words: “China, China, China.” (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 16, 2019 - 12:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese bombers. Chinese hypersonic missiles. Chinese cyberattacks. Chinese anti-satellite weapons. To a remarkable degree, the 2020 Pentagon budget proposal is shaped by national security threats that Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has summarized in three words: "China...
Read More
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a news conference at the State Department, Friday, March 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 15, 2019 - 3:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Friday that the U.S. expects North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to honor his promise to keep his missile launches and nuclear tests on hold, speaking after a top North Korean official suggested the moratorium was under review and could be lifted...
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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a news conference at the State Department, Friday, March 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 15, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid new tension between the two countries, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Friday that the U.S. expects North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to live up to his promise to President Donald Trump to continue his moratorium on missile launches and nuclear tests. "In Hanoi, on multiple...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 9, 2017 file photo, Russian Topol M intercontinental ballistic missile launcher rolls along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)
March 15, 2019 - 6:09 am
BERLIN (AP) — A group of European nations is urging Russia not to abandon a nuclear weapons treaty with the United States. Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands are also calling for new arms control agreements to address the rising power of China and other nations. The U.S. gave notice of its...
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North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui, center, speaks at a gathering for diplomats in Pyongyang, North Korea on Friday, March 15, 2018. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will soon make a decision on whether to continue diplomatic talks and maintain the country's moratorium on missile launches and nuclear tests, the senior North Korean official said, noting the U.S. threw away a golden opportunity at the recent summit between their leaders. Interpreter is on Choe's right and the man standing is unidentified vice director of foreign ministry’s North America desk. (AP Photo/Eric Talmadge)
March 15, 2019 - 2:12 am
PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will soon decide whether to continue diplomatic talks and maintain his moratorium on missile launches and nuclear tests, a senior North Korean official said Friday, adding that the U.S. threw away a golden opportunity at the recent...
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