Water quality

FILE - In this June 3, 2019 file photo, protesters with Stand.earth hold a banner in opposition to Carnival Corp. outside of federal court, in Miami. Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
October 02, 2019 - 4:35 pm
MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge is pushing top Carnival Corp. executives to work faster to fix ocean pollution problems by the world’s largest cruise line. At a hearing Wednesday in Miami federal court, U.S. District Judge Patricia Seitz said she expects more concrete action and fewer promises from...
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FILE - In this June 3, 2019 file photo, protesters with Stand.earth hold a banner in opposition to Carnival Corp. outside of federal court, in Miami. Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
October 02, 2019 - 1:55 am
MIAMI (AP) — Top Carnival Corp. executives are due back in court to explain what the world's largest cruise line is doing to reduce ocean pollution. A hearing is set Wednesday in Miami federal court for an update on what steps Carnival is taking. Chairman Micky Arison, who also owns the Miami Heat...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2010, file photo, a massive fire roars through a neighborhood in San Bruno, Calif. U.S. transportation officials have finalized long-delayed measures meant to prevent pipeline spills and deadly gas explosions but don't address recommended steps to lessen accidents once they occur. They had been in the works for almost a decade following a massive gas explosion in San Bruno. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
October 01, 2019 - 7:35 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. transportation officials on Tuesday adopted long-delayed measures that are meant to prevent pipeline spills and deadly gas explosions but don't address recommended steps to lessen accidents once they occur. The new rules from the Department of Transportation apply to...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2016 file photo, a city worker uses a power washer to clean the sidewalk by a tent city along Division Street in San Francisco. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says California is falling short on preventing water pollution, largely because of its problem with homelessness in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined the complaints Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019 in a letter to California Gov. Gavin Newsom. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
September 26, 2019 - 7:38 pm
Escalating its fight with California, the Trump administration accused the state Thursday of failing to stop water pollution from such sources as human waste left on the pavement by the homeless in big cities such as San Francisco and Los Angeles. San Francisco's mayor disputed any connection...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2016 file photo, a city worker uses a power washer to clean the sidewalk by a tent city along Division Street in San Francisco. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says California is falling short on preventing water pollution, largely because of its problem with homelessness in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined the complaints Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019 in a letter to California Gov. Gavin Newsom. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
September 26, 2019 - 1:53 pm
California is failing to protect its waters from pollution, partly because of a worsening problem with homelessness in large cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler outlined a series of alleged...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 1:21 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Earth is in more hot water than ever before, and so are we, an expert United Nations climate panel warned in a grim new report Wednesday. Sea levels are rising at an ever-faster rate as ice and snow shrink, and oceans are getting more acidic and losing oxygen, the Intergovernmental...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 12:21 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Earth is in more hot water than ever before, and so are we, an expert United Nations climate panel warned in a grim new report Wednesday. Sea levels are rising at an ever-faster rate as ice and snow shrink, and oceans are getting more acidic and losing oxygen, the Intergovernmental...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 11:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Earth is in more hot water than ever before, and so are we, an expert United Nations climate panel warned in a grim new report Wednesday. Sea levels are rising at an ever-faster rate as ice and snow shrink, and oceans are getting more acidic and losing oxygen, the Intergovernmental...
Read More
FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 7:03 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Due to climate change, the world's oceans are getting warmer, rising higher, losing oxygen and becoming more acidic at an ever-faster pace and melting even more ice and snow, a grim international science assessment concludes. But that's nothing compared to what Wednesday's special...
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FILE - This early Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 file photo shows an aerial view of large Icebergs floating as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Greenland has been melting faster in the last decade, and this summer, it has seen two of the biggest melts on record since 2012. A special United Nations-affiliated oceans and ice report released on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2019 projects three feet of rising seas by the end of the century, much fewer fish, weakening ocean currents, even less snow and ice, and nastier hurricanes, caused by climate change. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
September 25, 2019 - 5:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Climate change is making the world's oceans warm, rise, lose oxygen and get more acidic at an ever-faster pace, while melting even more ice and snow, a grim international science assessment concludes. But that's nothing compared to what Wednesday's special United Nations-affiliated...
Read More

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