Water environment

FILE - In this April 11, 2018 file photo, water moves through a spillway of the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. Farmers, environmentalists, tribal leaders and public utility officials are eagerly awaiting a federal report due Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, that could decide the fate of four hydroelectric dams on the Snake River. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios,File)
February 28, 2020 - 7:49 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A long-awaited federal report out Friday rejected the idea of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort tosave threatened and endangered salmon, saying such a dramatic approach would destabilize the power grid, increase overall...
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FILE - In this April 11, 2018 file photo, water moves through a spillway of the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. Farmers, environmentalists, tribal leaders and public utility officials are eagerly awaiting a federal report due Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, that could decide the fate of four hydroelectric dams on the Snake River. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios,File)
February 28, 2020 - 3:02 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A long-awaited federal report out Friday rejected the idea of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort to save more than a dozen species of threatened or endangered salmon, saying such a dramatic approach would destabilize the...
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FILE - In this April 11, 2018 file photo, water moves through a spillway of the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River near Almota, Wash. Farmers, environmentalists, tribal leaders and public utility officials are eagerly awaiting a federal report due Friday, Feb. 28, 2020, that could decide the fate of four hydroelectric dams on the Snake River. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios,File)
February 28, 2020 - 1:01 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A long-awaited federal report out Friday rejected the idea of removing four hydroelectric dams on a major Pacific Northwest river in a last-ditch effort to save more than a dozen species of threatened or endangered salmon, saying such a dramatic approach would destabilize the...
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Sean de Guzman, chief of snow surveys, for the California Department of Water Resources, right, carries the snowpack measuring tube as he and DWR's Chief of State Water Project Operations Molly White, left, and Water Resources Engineer Nathan Burley, center, cross an area normally covered in snow during the third snow survey of the season at Phillips Station near Echo Summit, Calif., Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. The survey found the snowpack at 29 inches deep with a water content of 11.5 inches at this location. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
February 27, 2020 - 7:34 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A dry beginning of the year has left most of California abnormally parched, as officials brace for the possibility of an early and more intense wildfire season amid record-breaking temperatures. Drought has expanded from just under 10% of the state last week to nearly a quarter...
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FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2020, file photo Interior Secretary David Bernhardt joins President Donald Trump as he speaks at a campaign rally in Colorado Springs, Colo. The Trump administration moved Thursday on a water-recycling push it says could get good use out of more of the wastewater that industries, cities and farms spew out, including the billions of barrels of watery waste generated by oil and gas fields each year. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
February 27, 2020 - 7:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved Thursday on a water-recycling push it says could get good use out of more of the wastewater that industries, cities and farms spew out, including the billions of barrels of watery waste generated by oil and gas fields each year. Some environmental...
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A man climbs a bluff on Corona Heights in front of the skyline seen from Tank Hill in San Francisco, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. California officials are bracing for the potential of another drought and an early and more intense wildfire season amid a record-breaking warm and dry February. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
February 27, 2020 - 5:29 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A dry beginning of the year has left most of California abnormally parched and officials are bracing for the possibility of an early and more intense wildfire season amid record-breaking temperatures. Drought has expanded from just under 10% last week to nearly a quarter of the...
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In this Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, photo, animal park curator Jeff Pawloski feeds two new sea lions from California, Niblet, left, and Brawler at Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The pair were rescued separately by the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, a nonprofit organization that rescues, rehabilitates and releases marine animals back to the wild. (Dennis Oda/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)
February 27, 2020 - 11:26 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Two sea lions rescued off the coast of California are making their debut at a new home in a Hawaii aquatic park. The sea lions named Niblet and Brawler are 3-year-old females and joined the aquatic attractions at Sea Life Park on Oahu Wednesday, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported...
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In this Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, photo, animal park curator Jeff Pawloski feeds two new sea lions from California, Niblet, left, and Brawler at Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The pair were rescued separately by the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, a nonprofit organization that rescues, rehabilitates and releases marine animals back to the wild. (Dennis Oda/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)
February 27, 2020 - 11:25 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Two sea lions rescued off the coast of California are making their debut at a new home in a Hawaii aquatic park. The sea lions named Niblet and Brawler are 3-year-old females and joined the aquatic attractions at Sea Life Park on Oahu Wednesday, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported...
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February 24, 2020 - 1:04 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Tiny bits of broken-down plastic smaller than a fraction of a grain of riceare turning up everywhere in oceans, from the water tothe guts of fish and the poop of sea otters and giant killer whales. Yet little is known about the effects of these “microplastics" — onsea...
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February 24, 2020 - 12:21 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Tiny bits of broken-down plastic smaller than a fraction of a grain of riceare turning up everywhere in oceans, from the water tothe guts of fish and the poop of sea otters and giant killer whales. Yet little is known about the effects of these “microplastics" — onsea...
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