Water environment

August 23, 2019 - 1:57 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Attorneys general from a dozen western states want the Trump administration to halt a proposal by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that they say usurps states' authority over their own water. North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said the Water Supply Rule proposed in...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 12:15 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 11:23 am
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 10:32 am
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, photo several dead fish float along the bank of Burns Ditch near the Portage Marina in Portage, Ind. Some beaches along northwestern Indiana's Lake Michigan shoreline are closed after authorities say a chemical spill in a tributary caused a fish kill. (John Luke/The Times via AP)
August 17, 2019 - 2:43 pm
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — A steel company apologized for a spill of cyanide and ammonia that led to a fish kill and prompted the closure of beaches along Lake Michigan. ArcelorMittal issued a statement Friday night saying it "apologizes and accepts responsibility for the incident from the Burns Harbor...
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Elaine Younger, 11, and Tahvion Williams, 14, right, load water in their family's van at the Newark Health Department in Newark, N.J., Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Residents began picking up bottled water on Monday, days after elevated lead levels were found in homes where city-issued filters had been distributed months ago as part of an ongoing effort to combat contamination. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
August 15, 2019 - 6:48 pm
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey's largest city faced off in court Thursday against an environmental group seeking to force officials to expand the distribution of bottled water to more residents facing potentially high lead levels. The arguments in federal court came days after the U.S...
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This March 26, 2019 photo shows the water level of the Colorado River, as seen from the Hoover Dam, Ariz. For the seven states that rely on the Colorado River that carries snowmelt from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, that means a future with increasingly less water for farms and cities although climate scientists say it's hard to predict how much less. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, will release its projections for next year's supply from Lake Mead, which feeds Nevada, Arizona and California. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
August 15, 2019 - 2:20 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2011 file photo visitors view the dramatic bend in the Colorado River at the popular Horseshoe Bend in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, in Page, Ariz. Some 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming draw from the Colorado River and its tributaries. Much of that originates as snow. A wet winter likely will fend off mandated water shortages for states in the U.S. West that rely on the river but won't erase the impact of climate change. Climate change means the region is still getting drier and hotter. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
August 15, 2019 - 9:42 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region...
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Mexico's Cecilia Perez, center, collapses after competing in a women's triathlon test event at Odaiba Marine Park, a venue for marathon swimming and triathlon at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, in Tokyo. Tokyo’s summer heat has forced an Olympic women’s triathlon qualifying event to be shortened because of high temperatures that are likely to plague next year’s games. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 15, 2019 - 7:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo's summer heat has forced an Olympic women's triathlon qualifying event to be shortened because of high temperatures that are likely to impact next year's games. The International Triathlon Union reduced the running portion of the triathlon from 10 kilometers to 5 kilometers on...
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Mexico's Cecilia Perez, center, collapses after competing in a women's triathlon test event at Odaiba Marine Park, a venue for marathon swimming and triathlon at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, in Tokyo. Tokyo’s summer heat has forced an Olympic women’s triathlon qualifying event to be shortened because of high temperatures that are likely to plague next year’s games. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 15, 2019 - 5:15 am
TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo's summer heat has forced an Olympic women's triathlon qualifying event to be shortened because of high temperatures that are likely to impact next year's games. The International Triathlon Union reduced the running portion of the triathlon from 10 kilometers to 5 kilometers on...
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