War crimes

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
March 20, 2019 - 10:28 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. Karadzic showed almost no reaction as...
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FILE - In this Aug. 25, 1992 file photo, Radovan Karadzic, Bosnian Serb leader in Bosnia-Herzegovina, indicates the Serb territories in Yugoslavia during a news conference in London. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)
March 20, 2019 - 9:56 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on a U.N. court's decision on the conviction and sentencing of ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic (all times local): 2:50 p.m. Dozens of survivors and relatives of the victims from Bosnia's 1992-95 war have gathered to watch the broadcast of the final...
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FILE - In this Aug. 25, 1992 file photo, Radovan Karadzic, Bosnian Serb leader in Bosnia-Herzegovina, indicates the Serb territories in Yugoslavia during a news conference in London. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)
March 20, 2019 - 9:10 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on a U.N. court's decision on the conviction and sentencing of ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic (all times local): 14:10 p.m. A hearing is underway at a United Nations court where judges will hand down their decisions in the appeal by former Bosnian...
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FILE - In this Thursday July 31, 2008 file photo, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic stands in the courtroom during his initial appearance at the U.N.'s Yugoslav war crimes tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (Jerry Lampen/Pool via AP, File)
March 20, 2019 - 8:30 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — United Nations judges are set to hand down their decisions Wednesday in the appeal by former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic against his convictions and 40-year sentence for masterminding atrocities in his country's devastating 1992-95 war. Karadzic appealed his...
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FILE - In this Sept. 23, 1992 file photo, Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic holds a knife he said was seized from Bosnian Croat soldiers in Bosnia during a news conference in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/File)
March 19, 2019 - 7:25 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals...
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Backdropped by the Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Saturday, March 16, 2019. World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
March 16, 2019 - 8:32 pm
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The white supremacist suspected in the mosque shootings that left at least 50 people dead in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years, where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. Authorities...
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Backdropped by the Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Saturday, March 16, 2019. World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
March 16, 2019 - 2:16 pm
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The white supremacist suspected in the mosque shootings that left at least 49 people dead in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years, where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. Authorities...
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Backdropped by the Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Saturday, March 16, 2019. World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
March 16, 2019 - 12:57 pm
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The white supremacist suspected in the mosque shootings that left at least 49 people dead in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years, where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. Authorities...
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Backdropped by the Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Saturday, March 16, 2019. World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
March 16, 2019 - 11:47 am
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The white supremacist suspected in the mosque shootings that left at least 49 people dead in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years, where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. Authorities...
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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a news conference at the State Department, Friday, March 15, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
March 15, 2019 - 2:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States will revoke or deny visas to International Criminal Court personnel seeking to investigate alleged war crimes and other abuses committed by U.S. forces in Afghanistan or elsewhere, and may do the same with those who seek action against Israel, Secretary of State...
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