Walruses

In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 5:58 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:03 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 9:50 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More
In this Nov. 14, 2019, photo provided by John Guillote and taken from an aerial drone shows the U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq as it makes its way through sea ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's north coast. University of Washington scientists onboard the research vessel are studying the changes and how less sea ice will affect coastlines, which already are vulnerable to erosion because increased waves delivered by storms. More erosion would increase the chance of winter flooding in villages and danger to hunters in small boats. (John Guillote via AP)
November 19, 2019 - 1:11 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The U.S. research vessel Sikuliaq can break through ice as thick as 2.5 feet (0.76 meters). In the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska this month, which should be brimming with floes, its limits likely won’t be tested. University of Washington researchers left Nome on Nov. 7 on...
Read More
Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:02 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
Read More
Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:57 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
Read More
Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
Read More
This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
Read More