Virology

Mark Schipp, the President of World Organization for Animal Health briefs media in Sydney, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, on the threat of African swine fever. Schipp says that the spread of the disease in the past year to countries including China, which has half the world's pig population, had inflamed a worldwide crisis. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
October 31, 2019 - 3:49 am
SYDNEY (AP) — Around a quarter of the world's pigs are expected to die from African swine fever as authorities grapple with a complex disease spreading rapidly in the globalization era, the World Organization for Animal Health's president said Thursday. A sharp reduction in the world's pig...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The poliolike syndrome, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, is very rare. Since the first reports from California in...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
October 21, 2019 - 11:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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September 08, 2019 - 11:08 pm
BOSTON (AP) — U.S. Sens. Edward Markey and Elizabeth Warren are pressing federal health officials on research efforts to combat eastern equine encephalitis. The two Massachusetts Democrats this week sent a letter to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases within the National...
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In this May 8, 2019, photo, pigs eat feed at a pig farm in Panggezhuang village in northern China's Hebei province. As a deadly virus ravages pig herds across Asia, scientists are accelerating efforts to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
August 21, 2019 - 12:20 am
BEIJING (AP) — Scientists are working to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply as a deadly virus ravages Asia's pig herds. Farmers have long contained its spread by quarantining and killing infected animals, but the disease's devastating march into East Asia is intensifying the...
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In this May 8, 2019, photo, pigs eat feed at a pig farm in Panggezhuang village in northern China's Hebei province. As a deadly virus ravages pig herds across Asia, scientists are accelerating efforts to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
August 20, 2019 - 1:14 am
BEIJING (AP) — Scientists are working to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply as a deadly virus ravages Asia's pig herds. Farmers have long contained its spread by quarantining and killing infected animals, but the disease's devastating march into East Asia is intensifying the...
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In this May 8, 2019, photo, pigs eat feed at a pig farm in Panggezhuang village in northern China's Hebei province. As a deadly virus ravages pig herds across Asia, scientists are accelerating efforts to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
August 20, 2019 - 1:11 am
BEIJING (AP) — Scientists are working to develop a vaccine to help protect the world's pork supply from a deadly virus that's ravaging pig herds in Asia. Farmers have long contained the spread of African swine fever by quarantining and killing infected animals, but the disease's appearance in more...
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FILE - This Monday, May 15, 2017, file photo shows Marcus Hutchins, a British cybersecurity expert during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. The British cybersecurity researcher hailed as a hero for credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Hutchins’ attorneys say in a Friday, April 19, 2019 filing that the 24-year-old is pleading guilty to developing the malware and conspiring to distribute it from 2012 to 2015. In exchange for his plea to those two charges, prosecutors are dismissing eight others. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
April 20, 2019 - 2:16 pm
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a joint court filing Friday that the 24-year-old...
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FILE - This Monday, May 15, 2017, file photo shows Marcus Hutchins, a British cybersecurity expert during an interview in Ilfracombe, England. The British cybersecurity researcher hailed as a hero for credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Hutchins’ attorneys say in a Friday, April 19, 2019 filing that the 24-year-old is pleading guilty to developing the malware and conspiring to distribute it from 2012 to 2015. In exchange for his plea to those two charges, prosecutors are dismissing eight others. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein, File)
April 20, 2019 - 1:05 pm
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a joint court filing Friday that the 24-year-old...
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April 20, 2019 - 11:26 am
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 has pleaded guilty to developing malware to steal banking information. Federal prosecutors in Wisconsin and Marcus Hutchins' attorneys said in a filing Friday that the 24-year-old is...
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