Violence

FILE - In this March 15, 2020, file photo, people wait in line to enter a gun store in Culver City, Calif. Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva, who was sued by gun-rights groups after trying to shut down firearms dealers in the wake of coronavirus concerns, said Monday, March 30, that he is abandoning the effort. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
April 01, 2020 - 5:49 pm
Background checks required to buy firearms have spiked to record numbers in the past month, fueled by a run on guns from Americans panicked about their safety during the coronavirus crisis. According to figures from the FBI, there were 3.7 million background checks done in March — the most for a...
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FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2017, file photo, Billy Joe Saunders, of Britain, celebrates his win over David Lemieux, of Canada, to retain the WBO middleweight boxing title in Laval, Quebec. Saunders had his boxing license suspended Monday, March 30, 2020, after publishing a social media video in which he appeared to condone domestic violence amid the coronavirus outbreak. He has apologized for his remarks, saying: “It was a silly mistake but I didn't mean to cause any harm to anyone and I certainly wouldn't promote domestic violence.”(Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP)
March 30, 2020 - 9:57 am
CARDIFF, Wales (AP) — British boxer Billy Joe Saunders had his boxing license suspended Monday after publishing a social media video in which he appeared to condone domestic violence amid the coronavirus outbreak. The WBO super-middleweight champion filmed himself working out and offered men advice...
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People wait in a line to enter a gun store in Culver City, Calif., March 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
March 27, 2020 - 3:53 pm
In some parts of the U.S., authorities say gun shops aren't essential businesses and should close during stay-at-home orders meant to slow the coronavirus. In other places, officials are stopping background checks for concealed carry permits. Elsewhere, city leaders have invoked emergency powers...
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Indians stand in marked positions to buy essential commodities from a grocery store in Mumbai, India, Wednesday, March 25, 2020.The world's largest democracy went under the world's biggest lockdown Wednesday, with India's 1.3 billion people ordered to stay home in a bid to stop the coronavirus pandemic from spreading and overwhelming its fragile health care system as it has done elsewhere. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death.(AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
March 25, 2020 - 8:09 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Indians struggled to comply with the world's largest coronavirus lockdown on Wednesday as the government began the gargantuan task of keeping 1.3 billion people indoors. Official assurances that essentials wouldn't run out clashed with people's fears that the disease toll could...
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Police caution tape surrounds a playground in Lake Oswego, Ore., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020, the day after Gov. Kate Brown issued a statewide stay-at-home order that closed many businesses, as well as all playgrounds, basketball courts and sport courts. As families across the country and the globe hunker down at home, it's another danger, equally insidious if less immediately obvious, that has advocates deeply concerned: A potential spike in domestic violence, as victims spend day after day trapped at home with their abusers. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
March 24, 2020 - 6:35 pm
“Safer at Home.” It's a slogan of choice for the mandatory confinement measures aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus. But it's not true for everyone. As the world's families hunker down, there's another danger, less obvious but just as insidious, that worries advocates and officials: a...
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FILE - In this March 17, 2019 file photo, a police officer stands guard in front of the Masjid Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, where one of two mass shootings occurred. According to a report released Wednesday, March 18, 2020, by an organization that tracks far-right extremists, a recent surge in white nationalism in the U.S. has led to a growing threat of violence by factions that embrace bloodshed and advocate for a race war. The man accused of attacking two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, and killing 51 people in March 2019 devoted a section of his manifesto to the concept of accelerationism, a fringe philosophy that promotes mass violence to fuel society’s collapse. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)
March 18, 2020 - 12:19 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A recent surge in white nationalism in the U.S. has led to a growing threat of violence by factions that embrace bloodshed and advocate for a race war, according to a report released Wednesday by an organization that tracks far-right extremists. The Southern Poverty Law...
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In this April 10, 2013 file photo, Jonathan Scalise, owner of Ammunition Storage Components, holds up a 10-round, left, and a 30-round magazine that his company manufacturers for the AR-15 rifle in New Britain, Conn. Gun rights supporters are suing Connecticut officials over part of a 2013 state gun control law passed after the Sandy Hook school shooting, saying it unconstitutionally bans people from loading more than 10 rounds of ammunition into their firearms. The lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 cites the Second Amendment right to bear arms and the ability of people to better defend themselves with more bullets in their guns. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
March 11, 2020 - 1:35 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gun rights supporters are suing Connecticut officials over part of a 2013 state gun control law passed after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, saying it unconstitutionally bans people from loading more than 10 rounds of ammunition into their firearms. The lawsuit...
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Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, center, opens his coat after a few rockets are fired during his speech after being sworn, at his inauguration ceremony at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 9, 2020. To reassure his supporters, Ghani threw open his jacket saying he wasn't even wearing a bullet proof vest. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
March 11, 2020 - 1:19 pm
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — After a series of delays, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani issued a decree early Wednesday promising to release 1,500 Taliban prisoners as a goodwill gesture to get intra-Afghan negotiations started. A recent peace deal signed between the United States and the Taliban called...
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Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, center, opens his coat after a few rockets are fired during his speech after being sworn, at his inauguration ceremony at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, March 9, 2020. To reassure his supporters, Ghani threw open his jacket saying he wasn't even wearing a bullet proof vest. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
March 11, 2020 - 2:51 am
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — After a series of delays, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani issued a decree early Wednesday promising to release 1,500 Taliban prisoners as a goodwill gesture to get intra-Afghan negotiations started. A recent peace deal signed between the United States and the Taliban called...
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In this Monday, March 9, 2020, photo, Afghanistan's Abdullah Abdullah, front left, greets his supporters after being sworn in as president in Kabul, Afghanistan. Washington moved forward Tuesday on its peace deal with the Taliban, launching its troop withdrawal, while praising Afghanistan's newly installed President Ashraf Ghani's promise to proceed with a Taliban prisoner release as well as cobble together a team to start negotiations with the insurgent group. But the dueling presidential inaugurations a day earlier with Ghani's rival, Abdullah Abdullah also being sworn in as president is indicative of the uphill task facing Washington's peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad as he tries to get Afghanistan's bickering leadership to come together. (AP Photo)
March 11, 2020 - 1:13 am
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — After a series of delays, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani issued a decree early Wednesday promising to release 1,500 Taliban prisoners as a goodwill gesture to get intra-Afghan negotiations started, even though a deal signed by the United States and the Taliban calls for the...
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