Violations of environmental law

November 06, 2019 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seems uncertain about how to decide a closely watched case from Hawaii about the reach of landmark federal clean-water protections. The justices heard arguments Wednesday about whether a sewage treatment plant needs a federal permit when it sends wastewater deep...
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In this photo taken Friday, Nov. 1, 2019, San Francisco Mayor London Breed smiles while speaking at the annual Women In Construction Expo in San Francisco. San Francisco's mayor faces easy re-election in Tuesday's election but a hefty list of problems to solve, including a homelessness crisis, drug epidemic and a housing shortfall. The former president of the Board of Supervisors narrowly won a special June 2018 election to fill the seat left vacant by the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
November 04, 2019 - 5:03 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — After a bruising fight last year to become San Francisco's mayor, London Breed faces token opposition on Tuesday's ballot as she struggles to find solutions to the city's homelessness crisis, drug epidemic and a housing shortfall that have put the politically liberal city in...
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Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada are seen demonstrating in sub-freezing temperatures on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019 in Billings, Mont. The State Department has released a new environmental study of the long-stalled, $8 billion project. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
October 29, 2019 - 9:08 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada said the Trump administration is understating the potential for the line to break and spill into water bodies such as Montana's Missouri River, as the U.S. State Department held the sole public meeting Tuesday on a new...
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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, caribou from the Porcupine Caribou Herd migrate onto the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. Opponents of oil drilling in America's largest wildlife refuge have a message for oil drillers and the people who finance them: Don't become the company known for the demise of America's polar bears. The Department of the Interior hopes to conduct a lease sale in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge by the end of the year but environmental groups say they will challenge those plans in federal court and the court of public opinion. Congress did not take a direct vote on opening the refuge. Instead, a provision for lease sales was included in President Donald Trump's Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in Dec. 2017. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
October 26, 2019 - 12:06 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Opponents of oil drilling in America's largest wildlife refuge have a message for oil drillers and the people who finance them: Don't become the company known for the demise of America's polar bears. The Department of the Interior hopes to conduct a lease sale in the Arctic...
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President Donald Trump speaks at the 9th annual Shale Insight Conference at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 23, 2019 - 5:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday moved to topple California as a leading voice against climate change, charging in a federal lawsuit that the state exceeded its constitutional authority by joining with a Canadian province in a program to cut climate-damaging fossil fuel...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Caldwell County, Mo., Detention Center shows Garland Nelson. A Missouri prosecutor and sheriff will give an update Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, into the disappearance of two Wisconsin brothers who have been missing since July and are presumed dead. Caldwell County Maj. Mitch Allen told the Kansas City Star that new charges will be filed against Nelson, the Missouri man already charged with tampering with a vehicle rented by Justin and Nick Diemel of Shawano County, Wisconsin. (Caldwell County Detention Center via AP, File)
October 23, 2019 - 2:40 pm
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri cattle farmer charged Wednesday with two counts of first-degree murder shot two brothers from Wisconsin, burned their bodies and dumped the remains on a manure pile on his property, investigators said. Garland Nelson, 25, of Braymer, is also charged with two...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Caldwell County, Mo., Detention Center shows Garland Nelson. A Missouri prosecutor and sheriff will give an update Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019, into the disappearance of two Wisconsin brothers who have been missing since July and are presumed dead. Caldwell County Maj. Mitch Allen told the Kansas City Star that new charges will be filed against Nelson, the Missouri man already charged with tampering with a vehicle rented by Justin and Nick Diemel of Shawano County, Wisconsin. (Caldwell County Detention Center via AP, File)
October 23, 2019 - 1:35 pm
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri cattle farmer charged Wednesday with two counts of first-degree murder shot two brothers from Wisconsin, burned their bodies and dumped the remains on a manure pile on his property, investigators said. Garland Nelson, 25, of Braymer, is also charged with two...
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FILE - In this Jan 8, 2016, file photo, Burns resident Steve Atkins, left, talks with Ammon Bundy, center, one of the sons of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, following a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore. Bundy’s family played central roles in a 2014 standoff over grazing fees in Nevada and the 2016 occupation of Oregon’s Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 21, 2019 - 7:01 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups and dwindling ranks of law enforcement officers, a congressional watchdog agency said Monday. The...
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FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2016, file photo, a man stands guard after several organizations arrived at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Ore. A new report from the Government Accountability Office highlights violence against public lands employees amid heightened tensions with anti-government groups. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 21, 2019 - 5:01 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups and dwindling ranks of law enforcement officers, a congressional watchdog agency said Monday. The...
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In this Oct. 11, 2019 photo, U.S. Bureau of Land Management Acting Director William "Perry" Pendley speaks at a conference for journalists in Fort Collins, Colorado. A new report from the Government Accountability Office highlights violence against employees for the BLM and other agencies amid heightened tensions with anti-government groups. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
October 21, 2019 - 2:50 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups, a congressional watchdog agency said Monday. The Government Accountability Office in a new report...
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