United States Supreme Court decisions

Civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is hugged as House Democrats gathered before passing the Voting Rights Advancement Act to eliminate potential state and local voter suppression laws, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. At right is Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., who introduced the bill and who represents Selma, Ala., a city that was at the forefront of the 1960s civil rights movement. They are joined at far right by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 06, 2019 - 2:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House approved a bill Friday that would restore key sections of the Voting Rights Act that once required officials in all or parts of 15 mostly Southern states to receive federal approval before making changes to the voting process. The bill would amend...
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December 06, 2019 - 2:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House approved a bill Friday that would restore key sections of the Voting Rights Act that once required officials in all or parts of 15 mostly Southern states to receive federal approval before making changes to the voting process. The bill would amend...
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December 06, 2019 - 12:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House has approved a bill that would restore key sections of the Voting Rights Act that once required officials in all or parts of 15 states to receive federal approval before making changes to the voting process. The bill would amend the 1965 law to...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 9:05 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A blind prisoner convicted of killing his estranged girlfriend by setting her on fire in her car was put to death Thursday in Tennessee's electric chair, becoming only the second inmate without sight to be executed in the U.S. since the reinstatement of the nation's death...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 7:40 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is set to carry out what is expected to be only the second execution of a blind prisoner in the United States since the nation reinstated the death penalty in 1976. The 53-year-old inmate, Lee Hall, was scheduled to die in the electric chair Thursday evening for...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 7:37 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is set to carry out what is expected to be only the second execution of a blind prisoner in the United States since the nation reinstated the death penalty in 1976. The 53-year-old inmate, Lee Hall, was scheduled to die in the electric chair Thursday evening for...
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FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2019 file photo, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts answers questions during an appearance at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn. How a Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump would unfold is not yet known, but among the issues senators will have to decide are how long it lasts and whether witnesses are called. Presiding over the trial will be Chief Justice John Roberts, who theoretically could issue key rulings on some of these questions. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
December 02, 2019 - 3:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Chief Justice John Roberts appeared Monday to be the key vote in whether the Supreme Court considers expanding gun rights or sidesteps its first case on the issue in nearly 10 years. The court’s dismissal of the case would be a disappointment to gun-rights advocates and a huge...
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FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington, at sunset. The Supreme Court is turning to gun rights for the first time in nearly a decade, even though New York City gun owners already have won changes to a regulation they challenged in court. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
December 01, 2019 - 11:46 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is turning to gun rights for the first time in nearly a decade, even though those who brought the case, New York City gun owners, already have won changes to the regulation they challenged. The justices’ persistence in hearing arguments Monday despite the city’s...
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FILE - In this June 24, 2019, file photo, the empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The lack of transparency at the Supreme Court begins with the heavy red drapes that frame the courtroom on all sides. The court replaced the drapes this summer, but it would not reveal the name of the company that did the work. The Supreme Court’s role in a bitterly divided Washington and nation may be more important than ever, yet basic details about how the court operates remain obscured. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
November 29, 2019 - 4:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The lack of transparency at the Supreme Court begins with the heavy red drapes that frame the courtroom on all sides. The court replaced the drapes this summer, but would not reveal the name of the company that did the work. The Supreme Court’s role in a bitterly divided...
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FILE - In this June 24, 2019, file photo, the empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The lack of transparency at the Supreme Court begins with the heavy red drapes that frame the courtroom on all sides. The court replaced the drapes this summer, but it would not reveal the name of the company that did the work. The Supreme Court’s role in a bitterly divided Washington and nation may be more important than ever, yet basic details about how the court operates remain obscured. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
November 29, 2019 - 8:22 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The lack of transparency at the Supreme Court begins with the heavy red drapes that frame the courtroom on all sides. The court replaced the drapes this summer, but would not reveal the name of the company that did the work. The Supreme Court’s role in a bitterly divided...
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