Tribal governments

FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2019, file photo, the first panels of levee border wall are seen at a construction site along the U.S.-Mexico border, in Donna, Texas. Major construction projects moving forward along the U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico amid the coronavirus pandemic are raising fears workers could spread the sickness within nearby communities. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
April 02, 2020 - 7:01 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Major construction projects moving forward along the U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico are raising fears the coronavirus could race through temporary work camps and spread to rural communities unable to handle an outbreak. Despite a clampdown on people’s movements in much...
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HOLD FOR USE WITH STORY MOVING THURSDAY, MARCH 19,2020-FILE - This Sept. 9, 2012 file photo shows the entrance to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, home to the Oglala Sioux tribe. Native American tribes across the U.S. for weeks have been shutting down casinos, hotels and tourist destinations, and shoring up services amid worries that the spread of the coronavirus quickly could overwhelm a chronically underfunded health care system and affect a population that suffers disproportionately from cancer, diabetes and some respiratory diseases. (AP Photo/Kristi Eaton, File)
March 21, 2020 - 11:06 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Sharon Bahe has made her home on the Navajo Nation a refuge, placing cedar branches and burning sage to help purify the space and praying for protection for herself and her children home from boarding school and a toddler with severe asthma. Her community of about 500 in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2015 file photo, marijuana plants grow in the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe's growing facility in Flandreau, S.D. Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe will vote this week on legalizing medical and recreational marijuana on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation in an initiative that many hope will bring economic development to one of the most impoverished areas in the country. If the measure is approved, the Oglala Sioux Tribe would become the only Native American tribe to set up a cannabis market in a state where it's otherwise illegal. The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe attempted to set up a marijuana resort in the eastern part of the state in 2015, but eventually burned its cannabis crop out of fear of a federal raid. (Joe Ahlquist/The Argus Leader via AP, File)
March 08, 2020 - 12:16 pm
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe will vote this week on legalizing medical and recreational marijuana on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation in an initiative that many hope will bring economic development to one of the most impoverished areas in the country. Neither...
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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2015 file photo, marijuana plants grow in the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe's growing facility in Flandreau, S.D. Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe will vote this week on legalizing medical and recreational marijuana on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation in an initiative that many hope will bring economic development to one of the most impoverished areas in the country. If the measure is approved, the Oglala Sioux Tribe would become the only Native American tribe to set up a cannabis market in a state where it's otherwise illegal. The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe attempted to set up a marijuana resort in the eastern part of the state in 2015, but eventually burned its cannabis crop out of fear of a federal raid. (Joe Ahlquist/The Argus Leader via AP, File)
March 08, 2020 - 12:15 pm
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe will vote this week on legalizing medical and recreational marijuana on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation in an initiative that many hope will bring economic development to one of the most impoverished areas in the country. Neither...
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Construction crew perform a controlled detonation at the base of Monument Hill in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument west of Lukeville, Ariz., on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. Construction crews in southern Arizona have recently began blasting hills at the site to clear space for a new border wall system, bulldozing through a place called Monument Hill to construct a 30-foot (9-meter) steel wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Josh Galemore/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
February 26, 2020 - 7:13 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A Native American leader from Arizona grew emotional Wednesday as he told a congressional committee about the pain members of his tribe feel about U.S. officials blasting through land they consider sacred to build part of President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. “...
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February 13, 2020 - 12:26 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota reached a proposed settlement agreement Thursday with American Indians who sued over the state’s voter ID laws requiring residents to provide a street address, arguing they are a form of voter suppression. A merican Indians argue that such addresses are not always...
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A protester holds a placard at a rally of advocates to voice opposition to efforts by the Trump administration to weaken the National Environmental Policy Act, which is the country's basic charter for protection of the outdoors on Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
February 11, 2020 - 5:04 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Tuesday hosted the first of two hearings on its proposal to speed energy and other projects by rolling back a landmark environmental law. Opponents from Western states argued the long-term benefits of keeping the environmental reviews. Among other changes,...
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Indian Prime minister Narendra Modi, center, along with Assam chief minister Sarbananda Sonowal, sixth right, Convener of North-East Democratic Alliance (NEDA) Himanta Bishwa Sarma, sixth left, and senior Bodo leaders wave to the gathering during an event to celebrate signing of a peace accord with the Bodo rebel group, National Democratic Front of Bodoland, in Kokrajhar, a town 250 kilometers (150 miles) west of Gauhati, India, Friday, Feb. 7, 2020. Modi said on Friday that his government will continue its peace push in insurgency-wracked northeast bordering China and Myanmar where signing of accords with key rebel groups led to surrender by thousands of fighters. The prime minister said decades of violent insurrection ended in the Bodo tribal heartland in Assam state following the signing of the Jan. 27 agreement by the government with the rebel group. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath)
February 07, 2020 - 6:16 am
GAUHATI, India (AP) — India’s prime minister said on Friday that his government will continue its peace push in the insurgency-wracked northeastern region bordering China and Myanmar where accords with key rebel groups have led to the surrender of thousands of fighters in recent weeks. Prime...
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FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2011, file photo, Leland Anthony, Arizona Rep. for Indian Health Incorp., left, speaks with Navajo code talker Joe Vandever Sr. during Native American Day at the roundhouse in Santa Fe, New Mexico. One of the few remaining Navajo Code Talkers who used their native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died. Joe Vandever Sr. died of health complications Friday, Jan. 31, 2020, in Haystack, New Mexico, west of Grants, according to his family. He was 96. Tribal leaders called Vandever a "great warrior" and a "compassionate family man," and asked Navajos to keep his spirit and his family in their prayers. (Jane Phillips/The New Mexican via AP)
January 31, 2020 - 2:21 pm
WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. (AP) — One of the few remaining Navajo Code Talkers who used their native language to confound the Japanese in World War II has died. Joe Vandever Sr. died of health complications Friday in Haystack, New Mexico, according to his family. He was 96. Tribal leaders called Vandever a...
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In this May 30, 2018, photo, Montville High School's Alexis Michon throws a pitch during a playoff game against Waterford in Montville, Conn. As Native American logos and mascots face growing scrutiny from state lawmakers, the Mohegan Tribe, which traces its local history back for centuries, said it no longer supports the use of Indian-related team names. (Sarah Gordon/The Day via AP)
January 27, 2020 - 11:15 am
MONTVILLE, Conn. (AP) — For decades the Montville High School athletic teams have competed as the “Indians” with the blessing of the Mohegans, the Native American tribe that traces its local history back centuries and today operates one of the world’s biggest casinos. Then last week, the Mohegan...
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