Tribal governments

FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 8:02 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 5:28 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 3:20 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A ceremonial Native American shield has been welcomed back to New Mexico by tribal leaders, in the culmination of a yearslong international campaign to reclaim the sacred object that held a place in a cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from a mesa-top indigenous village...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:34 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — When a ceremonial Native American shield was returned last week to New Mexico, tribal leaders were there to greet the sacred piece that held a place in their cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from their centuries-old, mesa-top village in the 1970s. Nearly four years ago...
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In this photo taken on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019, members of Amazon indigenous populations walk during a Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) procession from St. Angelo Castle to the Vatican. In foreground is a wooden statue portraying a naked pregnant woman. Pope Francis’ meeting on the Amazon is wrapping up after three weeks of debate over married priests, the environment _ and the destruction of indigenous statues that underscored the willingness of conservatives to violently vent their opposition to the pope. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
October 25, 2019 - 2:17 pm
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis asked forgiveness Friday from Amazonian bishops and tribal leaders after thieves stole indigenous statues from a Vatican-area church and tossed them into the Tiber River in a bold show of conservative opposition to history's first Latin American pope. Francis...
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FILE - In this April 27, 2019 file photo, dancers enter at the Gathering of Nations, one of the world's largest gatherings of indigenous people in Albuquerque, N.M. A handful of states, including New Mexico and Maine, are celebrating their first Indigenous Peoples' Day as part of a trend to move away from a day honoring Christopher Columbus. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras, File)
October 14, 2019 - 8:05 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A handful of states are celebrating their first Indigenous Peoples Day on Monday as part of a trend to move away from a day honoring Christopher Columbus. From Minnesota to Vermont, at least five states and Washington, D.C., have done away with Columbus Day celebrations in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. How much members of the Sackler family should be held accountable for the role their company, Purdue Pharma, played in the nation’s opioid crisis will be at the center of a hearing in federal bankruptcy court. State attorneys general who are pressing separate state claims against the Sacklers want their cases to continue even as Purdue’s bankruptcy case plays out. They will make that argument on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019 before a bankruptcy judge in White Plains, New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 11, 2019 - 2:20 pm
A judge will halt lawsuits against Purdue Pharma and its owners for six months in hopes of finalizing a settlement over the OxyContin maker's role in the national opioid crisis, he said Friday. In a hearing, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robert Drain strongly brushed aside the argument from a group of...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. How much members of the Sackler family should be held accountable for the role their company, Purdue Pharma, played in the nation’s opioid crisis will be at the center of a hearing in federal bankruptcy court. State attorneys general who are pressing separate state claims against the Sacklers want their cases to continue even as Purdue’s bankruptcy case plays out. They will make that argument on Friday, Oct. 11, 2019 before a bankruptcy judge in White Plains, New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 11, 2019 - 11:10 am
How much members of the Sackler family should be held accountable for the role their company, Purdue Pharma, played in the nation's opioid crisis will be at the center of a hearing Friday in federal bankruptcy court. Now, a judge has another element to consider as he decides whether to allow suits...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Local government lawsuits against the family that owns Purdue Pharma should be allowed to proceed even as the company attempts to reach a nationwide settlement in bankruptcy court over the toll of the opioids crisis, according to a court filing on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 08, 2019 - 6:59 pm
Arizona's attorney general is having misgivings about agreeing to Purdue Pharma's proposal to settle litigation over the opioid crisis. Attorney General Mark Brnovich, a Republican, said in a court filing late Monday that the OxyContin maker has "sought to undermine material terms of the deal." He...
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FILE - In this Sept. 12, 2019, file photo, cars pass Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Local government lawsuits against the family that owns Purdue Pharma should be allowed to proceed even as the company attempts to reach a nationwide settlement in bankruptcy court over the toll of the opioids crisis, according to a court filing on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
October 08, 2019 - 6:20 pm
Arizona's attorney general is having misgivings about agreeing to Purdue Pharma's proposal to settle litigation over the opioid crisis. Attorney General Mark Brnovich, a Republican, said in a court filing late Monday that the OxyContin maker has "sought to undermine material terms of the deal." He...
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