Telecommunications services

FILE - In this April 27, 2010 file photo, a woman using a cell phone walks past T-Mobile and Sprint stores in New York. T-Mobile, in its attempt to buy Sprint for $26.5 billion, shrinking the major wireless companies to three from four and creating another phone giant to rival AT&T and Verizon, has already notched approvals from federal national-security, telecommunications and antitrust regulators. Now it must convince a federal court judge in New York that the 14 state attorneys general suing to stop its deal are wrong. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
December 09, 2019 - 6:31 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Messages by a Sprint executive revealed in federal court suggested he thought an acquisition by T-Mobile might push up mobile-service prices for consumers, undercutting T-Mobile's argument that its deal will benefit Americans. The text messages, presented by attorneys for a...
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FILE - In this April 27, 2010 file photo, a woman using a cell phone walks past T-Mobile and Sprint stores in New York. T-Mobile, in its attempt to buy Sprint for $26.5 billion, shrinking the major wireless companies to three from four and creating another phone giant to rival AT&T and Verizon, has already notched approvals from federal national-security, telecommunications and antitrust regulators. Now it must convince a federal court judge in New York that the 14 state attorneys general suing to stop its deal are wrong. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
December 09, 2019 - 5:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — An antitrust suit aimed at blocking T-Mobile's acquisition of Sprint opened Monday in a crowded courtroom in New York with testimony from Sprint executives that touched on the consumer benefits of the company's competition with T-Mobile and other carriers. A group of 14 state...
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Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders speaks to a congregation at Reid Chapel AME Church on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)
December 06, 2019 - 8:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is promising to invest $150 billion to bring high-speed internet to “every household in America” while breaking up and better regulating monopolies he says currently limit access to drive up their profits. The Vermont senator on...
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Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders speaks to a congregation at Reid Chapel AME Church on Sunday, Dec. 1, 2019, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)
December 06, 2019 - 7:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is promising to invest $150 billion to bring high-speed internet to “every household in America” while breaking up and better regulating monopolies he says currently limit access to drive up their profits. The Vermont senator on...
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Song Liuping, chief legal officer of Huawei, speaks during a press conference at Huawei's campus in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong Province, Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Chinese tech giant Huawei is asking a U.S. federal court to throw out a rule that bars rural phone carriers from using government money to purchase its equipment on security grounds. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 05, 2019 - 12:03 am
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei is asking a U.S. federal court to throw out a rule that bars rural phone carriers from using government money to purchase its equipment on security grounds. The lawsuit announced Thursday is Huawei Technologies Ltd.’s second legal challenge this year...
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In this Nov. 20, 2019, photo, customers shop at a Huawei store at a shopping mall in Beijing. The founder of Huawei says the Chinese tech giant is moving its U.S. research center to Canada due to American restrictions on its activities. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 04, 2019 - 11:05 pm
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei is asking a U.S. federal court to throw out a rule that bars rural phone carriers from using government money to purchase its equipment on security grounds. The lawsuit announced Thursday is Huawei Technologies Ltd.’s second legal challenge this year...
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In this Nov. 21, 2019 photo, Shannon Booth, vice president and general manager for Gray Television who oversees company-owned Nebraska stations in Lincoln, Hastings and North Platte, poses for a photo in front of the KOLN television station's satellite dishes in Lincoln, Neb. An estimated 500,000 households nationwide don't have access to local broadcast channels because of a complicated federal law and a decades-long dispute between local broadcasters and satellite television providers. Households in the nation's "neglected markets" _ rural areas that can't get local broadcast signals, are forced to rely on satellite service with news from other states. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
November 24, 2019 - 10:18 am
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — When Dianne Johnson channel-surfs for news in her rural western Nebraska home, all she sees are stories about Colorado crime and car crashes from a Denver television station more than 200 miles away. It’s frustrating for the 61-year-old rancher, who wants to know the latest...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 9:07 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 2:28 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 1:07 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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