Telecommunications regulation

People watch a TV screen showing a file image of a ground test of North Korea's rocket engine during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019. North Korea said Sunday it carried out a "very important test" at its long-range rocket launch site that it reportedly rebuilt after having partially dismantled it after entering denuclearization talks with the United States last year. The sign reads: "Very important test." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
December 09, 2019 - 4:22 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A day after North Korea said it had performed a “very important test” at its long-range rocket launch site, there is wide speculation that it involved a new engine for either a space launch vehicle or a long-range missile. Whatever it was, the North Korean announcement...
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In this Nov. 21, 2019 photo, Shannon Booth, vice president and general manager for Gray Television who oversees company-owned Nebraska stations in Lincoln, Hastings and North Platte, poses for a photo in front of the KOLN television station's satellite dishes in Lincoln, Neb. An estimated 500,000 households nationwide don't have access to local broadcast channels because of a complicated federal law and a decades-long dispute between local broadcasters and satellite television providers. Households in the nation's "neglected markets" _ rural areas that can't get local broadcast signals, are forced to rely on satellite service with news from other states. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
November 24, 2019 - 10:18 am
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — When Dianne Johnson channel-surfs for news in her rural western Nebraska home, all she sees are stories about Colorado crime and car crashes from a Denver television station more than 200 miles away. It’s frustrating for the 61-year-old rancher, who wants to know the latest...
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In this Nov. 21, 2019 photo, Shannon Booth, vice president and general manager for Gray Television who oversees company-owned Nebraska stations in Lincoln, Hastings and North Platte, poses for a photo in front of the KOLN television station's satellite dishes in Lincoln, Neb. An estimated 500,000 households nationwide don't have access to local broadcast channels because of a complicated federal law and a decades-long dispute between local broadcasters and satellite television providers. Households in the nation's "neglected markets" _ rural areas that can't get local broadcast signals, are forced to rely on satellite service with news from other states. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
November 24, 2019 - 10:16 am
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — In many rural corners of America, television viewers who want to watch local news are getting stuck with irrelevant stories from out-of-state stations hundreds of miles away. It’s a major problem for viewers who rely on satellite television because they live too far from local...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 9:07 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 2:28 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 1:07 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission also proposed requiring companies that get government subsidies to rip out any equipment from Huawei and ZTE that they already have...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2018, file photo, a man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. The Federal Communications Commission on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 voted, 5-0, to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for networking equipment from companies that are a threat to national security. The agency says China’s Huawei and ZTE pose such a threat. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 22, 2019 - 12:09 pm
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for equipment from two Chinese companies, citing security threats. The Federal Communications Commission voted unanimously Friday to bar U.S. telecommunications providers from using government subsidies to pay for equipment from Huawei...
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Ambassador Kurt Volker, left, former special envoy to Ukraine, and Tim Morrison, a former official at the National Security Council are sworn in to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump's efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 19, 2019 - 4:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the public impeachment hearings into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Former Ukraine envoy Kurt Volker is testifying in a House impeachment hearing that Republican criticism of former Vice President Joe Biden is “not...
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Ambassador Kurt Volker, left, former special envoy to Ukraine, and Tim Morrison, a former official at the National Security Council are sworn in to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump's efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 19, 2019 - 4:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the public impeachment hearings into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine (all times local): 4 p.m. Tim Morrison, who recently left his National Security Council post, has told Congress that he is taking no position on whether President Donald Trump should...
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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., question Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, and National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, as they testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, during a public impeachment hearing of President Donald Trump's efforts to tie U.S. aid for Ukraine to investigations of his political opponents. Ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., right. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
November 19, 2019 - 2:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the public impeachment hearings into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine (all times local): 2:10 p.m. White House Pres Secretary Stephanie Grisham is slamming the first round of interviews in Tuesday’s impeachment hearings. The public heard Tuesday from Lt...
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