Teen welfare

In this Feb. 6, 2019 photo provided by Providence Health & Services, from left, Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore. The teens introduced legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days in an attempt to respond to a mental health crisis gripping the state. (Jessica Adamson/Providence Health & Services via AP)
July 21, 2019 - 3:12 pm
SALEM, Oregon (AP) — Oregon will allow students to take "mental health days" just as they would sick days, expanding the reasons for excused school absences to include mental or behavioral health under a new law that experts say is one of the first of its kind in the U.S. But don't call it coddling...
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In this Feb. 6, 2019 photo provided by Providence Health & Services, from left, Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore. The teens introduced legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days in an attempt to respond to a mental health crisis gripping the state. (Jessica Adamson/Providence Health & Services via AP)
July 21, 2019 - 12:05 pm
SALEM, Oregon (AP) — Oregon will allow students to take "mental health days" just as they would sick days, expanding the reasons for excused school absences to include mental or behavioral health under a new law that experts say is one of the first of its kind in the U.S. But don't call it coddling...
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In this Feb. 6, 2019 photo provided by Providence Health & Services, from left, Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore. The teens introduced legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days in an attempt to respond to a mental health crisis gripping the state. (Jessica Adamson/Providence Health & Services via AP)
July 21, 2019 - 11:58 am
SALEM, Oregon (AP) — A new law in Oregon allows students to take "mental health days" just as they would sick days. The teens behind the bill say it's meant to respond to a mental health crisis in schools. Gov. Kate Brown signed the measure into law last month. The Oregon Health Authority reports...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2016, file photo, a man smokes a marijuana joint at a party celebrating weed in Seattle. Legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults may have led to a slight decline in teen use. That’s according to research published Monday, July 8, 2019, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
July 08, 2019 - 9:02 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — New research suggests legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults in some states may have slightly reduced teens' odds of using pot. One reason may be that it's harder and costlier for teens to buy marijuana from licensed dispensaries than from dealers, said lead author Mark...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2016, file photo, a man smokes a marijuana joint at a party celebrating weed in Seattle. Legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults may have led to a slight decline in teen use. That’s according to research published Monday, July 8, 2019, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
July 08, 2019 - 6:20 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — New research suggests legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults in some states may have slightly reduced teens' odds of using pot. One reason may be that it's harder and costlier for teens to buy marijuana from licensed dispensaries than from dealers, said lead author Mark...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2016, file photo, a man smokes a marijuana joint at a party celebrating weed in Seattle. Legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults may have led to a slight decline in teen use. That’s according to research published Monday, July 8, 2019, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
July 08, 2019 - 3:50 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — New research suggests legalizing recreational marijuana for U.S. adults in some states may have slightly reduced teens' odds of using pot. One reason may be that it's harder and costlier for teens to buy marijuana from licensed dispensaries than from dealers, said lead author Mark...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2019 file photo, people hold signs that read "families belong together" in both English and Spanish during a vigil at Alice Hope Wilson Park in Brownsville, Texas to advocate against the separation of migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border. As the crisis at the border has deepened, as pregnant teens and teens with babies who are coming to the U.S. without their own parents face perilous conditions, according to immigrant advocates and attorneys who say that particular population of minors at the border faces extreme hardship. (Denise Cathey/The Brownsville Herald via AP, File)
July 04, 2019 - 4:12 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — As tales of wretchedness and overcrowding in government border detention facilities abound, one group of migrants is particularly vulnerable: teen moms and pregnant girls without parents of their own. Immigrant advocates and lawyers say the young mothers don't get special medical...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2019 file photo, people hold signs that read "families belong together" in both English and Spanish during a vigil at Alice Hope Wilson Park in Brownsville, Texas to advocate against the separation of migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border. As the crisis at the border has deepened, as pregnant teens and teens with babies who are coming to the U.S. without their own parents face perilous conditions, according to immigrant advocates and attorneys who say that particular population of minors at the border faces extreme hardship. (Denise Cathey/The Brownsville Herald via AP, File)
July 04, 2019 - 11:42 am
PHOENIX (AP) — As tales of wretchedness and overcrowding in government border detention facilities abound, one group of migrants is particularly vulnerable: teen moms and pregnant girls without parents of their own. Immigrant advocates and lawyers say the young mothers don't get special medical...
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In this photo taken May 23, 2019, Dave Marver, CEO of VICIS, a Seattle-based company that makes football helmets, talks in Seattle about his company's latest offering, the ULTIM cap. VICIS announced on Monday, July 1, the cap is intended for use with youth flag football and the quickly expanding competitive 7-on-7 football played during the offseason for youth and high school programs. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren). (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
July 01, 2019 - 3:03 am
SEATTLE (AP) — The company that produces the top-rated helmet for NFL players and introduced a youth version of the headgear is rolling out a version for flag football. Seattle-based VICIS already produces the helmet that rated best for three straight years at reducing head impact severity,...
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FILE - In this Saturday, June 23, 2018, file photo, a U.S. Border Patrol Agent walks between vehicles outside the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas. Advocates were shocked to find an underage mom and her tiny, premature newborn daughter huddled in a Border Patrol facility the second week of June 2019, in what they say was another example of the poor treatment immigrant families receive after crossing the border. The mother is a Guatemalan teen who crossed the border without a parent and was held at a facility in McAllen, Texas, with other families with children. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
June 15, 2019 - 7:05 pm
A U.S. Border Patrol facility in Texas came under new scrutiny Saturday after a teenage mother was found there with a premature baby. Immigrant advocates expected the facility in the U.S.-Mexico border city of McAllen to allow doctors inside to conduct health assessments, but it was not immediately...
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