Technology law and ethics

FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2018, file photo, a woman browses her smartphone as she walks by a Huawei store at a shopping mall in Beijing. China has called on the United States to ‘stop the unreasonable crackdown’ on Huawei following the tech giant’s indictment on charges of stealing technology, violating trade sanctions and lying to banks. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)
January 29, 2019 - 2:20 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's government called on Washington on Tuesday to "stop the unreasonable crackdown" on Huawei following the tech giant's indictment in the U.S. on charges of stealing technology and violating sanctions on Iran. Beijing will "firmly defend" its companies, said foreign ministry...
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In this Dec. 18, 2018, photo, the logo of Huawei stands on its office building at the research and development centre in Dongguan in south China's Guangdong province. The U.S. Justice Department unsealed criminal charges Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 against Chinese tech giant Huawei, a top company executive and several subsidiaries, alleging the company stole trade secrets, misled banks about its business and violated U.S. sanctions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
January 29, 2019 - 12:55 am
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei on Tuesday denied committing any of the violations cited in a U.S. indictment accusing the company of stealing technology, violating trade sanctions and lying to banks. The Justice Department unsealed criminal charges Monday that allege the company used...
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Microsoft Corp.'s Bing appp is seen with other mobile apps on a smartphone in Beijing, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. Chinese internet users have lost access to Microsoft Corp.'s Bing search engine, triggering grumbling about the ruling Communist Party's increasingly tight online censorship. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
January 24, 2019 - 9:51 pm
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese internet users lost access to Microsoft's Bing search engine for two days, setting off grumbling about the ruling Communist Party's increasingly tight online censorship. Microsoft Corp. said Friday that access had been restored. A brief statement gave no reason for the...
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January 24, 2019 - 7:07 am
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese internet users have lost access to Microsoft Corp.'s Bing search engine, setting off grumbling about the ruling Communist Party's increasingly tight online censorship. Comments on social media Thursday accused regulators of choking off access to information. Others complained...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 14, 2019 file photo, protestors gather on the streets during demonstrations over the hike in fuel prices in Harare, Zimbabwe. 2019 is already a busy year for internet shutdowns in Africa, with governments ordering cutoffs as soon as a crisis appears. Zimbabwe ordered a “total internet shutdown” in recent days during protests over a dramatic fuel price increase and a resulting deadly crackdown. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)
January 21, 2019 - 11:16 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe's government intensified its crackdown on dissent Monday by charging the leader of the country's largest labor organization with subversion, as the courts ruled that the shutdown of the internet was illegal. Zimbabwe police arrested Japhet Moyo, secretary general of...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 file photo, protestors gather near a burning tire during a demonstration over the hike in fuel prices in Harare, Zimbabwe. 2019 is already a busy year for internet shutdowns in Africa, with governments ordering cutoffs as soon as a crisis appears. Zimbabwe ordered a “total internet shutdown” in recent days during protests over a dramatic fuel price increase and a resulting deadly crackdown. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)
January 21, 2019 - 10:01 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — The Latest on Zimbabwe's ongoing protests and turmoil. (all times local): 5:00 p.m. Zimbabwe's High Court has ordered Zimbabwe's government to restore full internet to the country. The court ruled that the government's shutdown of the internet was illegal because the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a little-known device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. The Trump administration is moving to officially ban bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly like automatic firearms. A senior Justice Department official said Tuesday bump stocks will be banned under the federal law that prohibits machine guns. It will take effect in late March. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
December 18, 2018 - 11:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved Tuesday to officially ban bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire rapidly like automatic firearms, and has made them illegal to possess beginning in late March. The devices will be banned under a federal law that prohibits machine...
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December 14, 2018 - 11:55 am
MALONE, N.Y. (AP) — New York State Police say a 29-year-old upstate woman was texting while driving when she caused a crash that killed a 75-year-old woman last month. Troopers say Angel Oliver, of Bombay, was arraigned Thursday in Malone Town Court on criminally negligent homicide charges. Police...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 12, 2018 - 2:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. lawmakers' grilling of Google CEO Sundar Pichai may have sounded like a broken record, but it amplified the prickly issues facing tech companies as Democrats prepare to take control of the House next month. The 3 1/2-hour hearing Tuesday hit upon familiar themes — online...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Questions on privacy, data collection, China, Russia —and especially political bias — dominated Google CEO Sundar Pichai's grilling before Congress Tuesday. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy opened the House Judiciary Committee hearing by noting a "widening gap of distrust"...
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