Teacher unions

FILE - In this March 10, 2020 file photo, St Paul teachers picket outside Adams Elementary in St. Paul, Minn. The teachers union and Minnesota's second-largest school district reached a tentative contract agreement early Friday, March 13, ending a strike that began Tuesday and canceled classes for some 36,000 students. The union, which represents about 3,600 teachers and support staff, said it was in the best interest of all involved to settle the contract, given the uncertainty of possible school closures due to the coronavirus. (Glen Stubbe/Star Tribune via AP)
March 13, 2020 - 8:09 am
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The St. Paul teachers union and Minnesota's second-largest school district reached a tentative contract agreement early Friday, ending a strike that began Tuesday and canceled classes for some 36,000 students. The union, which represents about 3,600 teachers and support staff...
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Demonstrators gather at the Global Arts Plus Upper Campus in St. Paul before marching to district headquarters Tuesday, March 10, 2020. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP)
March 13, 2020 - 7:38 am
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The St. Paul teachers union and Minnesota's second-largest school district reached a tentative contract agreement early Friday, ending a strike that began Tuesday and canceled classes for some 36,000 students. The union, which represents about 3,600 teachers and support staff...
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Demonstrators gather at the Global Arts Plus Upper Campus in St. Paul before marching to district headquarters Tuesday, March 10, 2020. (Carlos Gonzalez/Star Tribune via AP)
March 13, 2020 - 7:04 am
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The St. Paul teachers union and Minnesota's second-largest school district reached a tentative contract agreement early Friday, ending a strike that began Tuesday and canceled classes for some 36,000 students. The union, which represents about 3,600 teachers and support staff...
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=Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate at the Gaillard Center, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, in Charleston, S.C., co-hosted by CBS News and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
February 26, 2020 - 7:21 pm
During the 2016 Democratic presidential race, when Bernie Sanders pushed making college free, it was seen as a radical idea from a fringe candidate. The Vermont senator returned with the same idea in 2020. Only this time, it's helped propel him to the front of field. While his “Medicare for All”...
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=Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate at the Gaillard Center, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, in Charleston, S.C., co-hosted by CBS News and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
February 26, 2020 - 2:21 pm
During the 2016 Democratic presidential race, when Bernie Sanders pushed making college free, it was seen as a radical idea from a fringe candidate. The Vermont senator has returned with the same idea in 2020. Only this time, it's helped propel him to the front of field. While his “Medicare for All...
Read More
=Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate at the Gaillard Center, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, in Charleston, S.C., co-hosted by CBS News and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
February 26, 2020 - 12:23 pm
During the 2016 Democratic presidential race, when Bernie Sanders pushed making college free, it was seen as a radical idea from a fringe candidate. The Vermont senator has returned with the same idea in 2020. Only this time, it's helped propel him to the front of field. While his “Medicare for All...
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FILE - In this Friday June 9, 2017 file photo, students are led out of school as members of the Fountain Police Department take part in an Active Shooter Response Training exercise at Fountain Middle School in Fountain, Colo. The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020 that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP, File)
February 11, 2020 - 3:38 pm
The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. The American Federation of Teachers and National...
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FILE - In this Friday June 9, 2017 file photo, students are led out of school as members of the Fountain Police Department take part in an Active Shooter Response Training exercise at Fountain Middle School in Fountain, Colo. The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020 that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. (Dougal Brownlie/The Gazette via AP, File)
February 11, 2020 - 3:27 pm
The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. The American Federation of Teachers and National...
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February 11, 2020 - 3:17 pm
The nation's two largest teachers unions want schools to revise or eliminate active shooter drills, asserting Tuesday that they can harm students' mental health and that there are better ways to prepare for the possibility of a school shooting. The American Federation of Teachers and National...
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This July 31, 2019 photo shows Stillwater Christian School parents Jeri Anderson and Kendra Espinoza at Woodland Park in Kalispell, Mont. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020 in a dispute over a Montana scholarship program for private K-12 education that also makes donors eligible for up to $150 in state tax credits. Advocates on both sides say the outcome could be momentous because it could lead to efforts in other states to funnel taxpayer money to religious schools. (Casey Kreider/The Daily Inter Lake via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 10:19 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Supreme Court that seems more favorable to religion-based discrimination claims is set to hear a case that could make it easier to use public money to pay for religious schooling in many states. The justices will hear arguments Wednesday in a dispute over a Montana scholarship...
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