Synthetic opioids

This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 3:22 pm
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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This Dec. 12, 2019, photo shows a sign at the Mundipharma International headquarters at Cambridge Science Park in England. Mundipharma is the international affiliate of Purdue Pharma, the maker of the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin. Mundipharma is now marketing Nyxoid, a new brand of naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication. (AP Photo/Leila Coker)
December 15, 2019 - 11:54 am
The gleaming white booth towered over the medical conference in Italy in October, advertising a new brand of antidote for opioid overdoses. “Be prepared. Get naloxone. Save a life,” the slogan on its walls said. Some conference attendees were stunned when they saw the company logo: Mundipharma, the...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 3:23 pm
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, photo, a recovering tramadol user waits for her medication at a de-addiction center in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. The pills were everywhere, as legitimate medication sold in pharmacies, but also illicit counterfeits hawked by itinerant peddlers and street vendors. India has twice the global average of illicit opiate consumption. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 10:53 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 9:15 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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In this Oct. 31, 2019, photo, an Indian drug addict lies unconscious by the side of a road in Kapurthala, in the northern Indian state of Punjab. Mass abuse of the opioid tramadol spans continents, from India to Africa to the Middle East, creating international havoc some experts blame on a loophole in narcotics regulation and a miscalculation of the drug’s danger. Punjab, the center of India's opioid epidemic, was among the latest to crack down on the tramadol trade. Researchers estimate about 4 million Indians use heroin or other opioids, and a quarter of them live in the Punjab, India's agricultural heartland bordering Pakistan. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
December 13, 2019 - 2:57 am
KAPURTHALA, India (AP) — Reports rolled in with escalating urgency — pills seized by the truckload, pills swallowed by schoolchildren, pills in the pockets of dead terrorists. These pills, the world has been told, are safer than the OxyContins, the Vicodins, the fentanyls that have wreaked so much...
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FILE - In this June 29, 2019, file photo, Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Skaggs throws to the Oakland Athletics during a baseball game in Anaheim, Calif. Talks to add testing for opioids began following the death of Skaggs, who was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1 before the start of a series against the Texas. Major League Baseball will start testing for opioids and cocaine, but only players who do not cooperate with their treatment plans will be subject to discipline, as part of changes announced Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, to the joint drug agreement between MLB and the players' association. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
December 12, 2019 - 3:53 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Major League Baseball will start testing for opioids and cocaine, but only players who do not cooperate with their treatment plans will be subject to discipline. Marijuana will be removed from the list of drugs of abuse and will be treated the same as alcohol as part of changes...
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December 12, 2019 - 1:54 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Major League Baseball will start testing for opioids and cocaine, but only players who do not cooperate with their treatment plans will be subject to discipline. Marijuana will be removed from the list of drugs of abuse and will be treated the same as alcohol as part of changes...
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December 12, 2019 - 11:23 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Major League Baseball will start testing for opioids and cocaine, but only players who do not cooperate with their treatment plans will be subject to discipline. Marijuana will be removed from the list of drugs of abuse and will be treated the same as alcohol as part of changes...
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Worker Gabe Ryan removes a sign that includes the name Arthur M. Sackler at an entrance to Tufts School of Medicine, Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019, in Boston. Tufts University says it is stripping the Sackler name from its campus in recognition of the family's connection to the opioid crisis. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
December 05, 2019 - 8:09 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Tufts University is cutting ties with the billionaire family that owns OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma, saying it will strip the Sackler name from its campus and accept no further donations amid concerns over the family's role in the opioid crisis. University officials announced the...
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