Surgical technology

August 01, 2019 - 1:31 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — An Australian farmer who found an orthopedic plate inside a crocodile's stomach said on Thursday he had been told the surgical device was from a human and had been contacted by relatives of missing persons anxious for clues. Koorana Crocodile Farm owner John Lever found...
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August 01, 2019 - 12:57 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — An Australian farmer who found an orthopedic plate inside a crocodile's stomach says he has been told the surgical device is from a human and has been contacted by relatives of missing persons anxious for clues. Koorana Crocodile Farm owner John Lever said on Thursday he...
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This undated photo provided by Margherita Mencattelli in April 2019 shows the tip of a robotic catheter equipped with a small camera and lighting encased in silicone, in Boston. Described in a report released on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, the device guided itself through the delicate chambers of a pig's heart as it was beating. (Margherita Mencattelli/Boston Children's Hospital via AP)
April 24, 2019 - 2:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Borrowing from the way cockroaches skitter along walls, scientists have created a robotic device that safely guides itself through the delicate chambers of a pig's heart as it's beating. It is one of the first times researchers have shown that a truly autonomous surgical robot can...
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This undated photo provided by Margherita Mencattelli in April 2019 shows the tip of a robotic catheter equipped with a small camera and lighting encased in silicone, in Boston. Described in a report released on Wednesday, April 24, 2019, the device guided itself through the delicate chambers of a pig's heart as it was beating. (Margherita Mencattelli/Boston Children's Hospital via AP)
April 24, 2019 - 2:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have created a small robotic device that guides itself safely through a beating pig's heart, demonstrating what such tools might one day do in surgery. And they borrowed some tricks from animals to do the job. To find its way to a specific point in the heart, the thin...
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This undated microscope image provided by the NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center in October 2018 shows squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, the most common form of cervical cancer. New evidence about a cancer operation in women finds a higher death rate for the less invasive version, challenging standard practice and the “less is more” approach to treating cervical cancer. Results were published online Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018 by the New England Journal of Medicine. (NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center)
October 31, 2018 - 5:03 pm
New evidence about a cancer operation in women finds a higher death rate for the less invasive version, challenging standard practice and the "less is more" approach to treating cervical cancer. The unexpected findings are prompting changes at some hospitals that perform radical hysterectomies for...
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