Supreme courts

FILE - In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has already heard, but not decided, a major case about political line-drawing that has the potential to reshape American politics. Now the high court is taking up another and its decision to do so is a lingering mystery that likely won’t be resolved until June. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 28, 2018 - 4:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up its second big partisan redistricting case of the term amid signs the justices could place limits on drawing maps for political gain. The justices are hearing arguments Wednesday in an appeal filed by Republicans in Maryland. They complain that...
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In this undated image provided by nonprofit advocacy and legal group Equally American, John Fitisemanu, an American Samoan and the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit against the United States seeking full U.S. citizenship, poses for a photo in Salt Lake City, Utah. A lawsuit filed Tuesday, March 27, 2018, in federal court in Utah seeks to grant U.S. citizenship status to American Samoans. John Fitisemanu, and others who were born in American Samoa, are asking the court for citizenship under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which confers citizenship at birth to anyone born in the U.S. (Katrina Keil Youd/Equally American via AP)
March 28, 2018 - 12:50 am
HONOLULU (AP) — John Fitisemanu, who works for a lab company in Utah, has paid U.S. taxes and been subject to American laws his whole life. But the 53-year-old father and husband isn't considered a U.S. citizen by the federal government because he was born in American Samoa, a U.S. territory and...
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In this undated image provided by nonprofit advocacy and legal group Equally American, John Fitisemanu, an American Samoan and the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit against the United States seeking full U.S. citizenship, poses for a photo in Salt Lake City, Utah. A lawsuit filed Tuesday, March 27, 2018, in federal court in Utah seeks to grant U.S. citizenship status to American Samoans. John Fitisemanu, and others who were born in American Samoa, are asking the court for citizenship under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution, which confers citizenship at birth to anyone born in the U.S. (Katrina Keil Youd/Equally American via AP)
March 28, 2018 - 12:09 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Meet John Fitisemanu, who works for a lab company in Utah, and has paid U.S. taxes and been subject to American laws his whole life. But the 53-year-old father and husband isn't considered a U.S. citizen by the federal government, because he was born in American Samoa, a U.S...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has already heard, but not decided, a major case about political line-drawing that has the potential to reshape American politics. Now the high court is taking up another and its decision to do so is a lingering mystery that likely won’t be resolved until June. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 28, 2018 - 12:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is taking up its second big partisan redistricting case of the term amid signs the justices could place limits on drawing maps for political gain. The justices are hearing arguments Wednesday in an appeal filed by Republicans in Maryland. They complain that...
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CORRECTS AGE TO 75, INSTEAD OF 76 - In this April 30, 1974, file photo, Linda Brown, right, and her two children pose for a photo in their home in Topeka, Kan. Brown, the Kansas girl at the center of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down racial segregation in schools, has died at age 75. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka confirmed that Linda Brown died Sunday, March 25, 2018. (AP Photo/File)
March 27, 2018 - 9:39 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — As a girl in Kansas, Linda Brown's father tried to enroll her in an all-white school in Topeka. He and several black families were turned away, sparking the Brown v. Board of Education case that challenged segregation in public schools. A 1954 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens testifies on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Stevens is calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment to allow for significant gun control legislation. The 97-year-old Stevens says in an essay on The New York Times website that repeal would weaken the National Rifle Association's ability to "block constructive gun control legislation." (AP Photo)
March 27, 2018 - 9:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment to allow for significant gun control legislation. The 97-year-old Stevens says in an essay on The New York Times website that repeal would weaken the National Rifle Association's...
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March 27, 2018 - 9:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is calling for the repeal of the Second Amendment to allow for significant gun control legislation. The 97-year-old Stevens says in an essay on The New York Times website that repeal would weaken the National Rifle Association's...
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CORRECTS AGE TO 75, INSTEAD OF 76 - FILE - This undated file photo, location unknown, shows Linda Brown. Brown, the Kansas girl at the center of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down racial segregation in schools, has died at age 75. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka confirmed that Linda Brown died Sunday, March 25, 2018. (AP Photo/File)
March 27, 2018 - 4:55 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — As a girl in Kansas, Linda Brown's father tried to enroll her in an all-white school in Topeka. He and several black families were turned away, sparking the Brown v. Board of Education case that challenged segregation in public schools. A 1954 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court...
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March 26, 2018 - 11:37 am
BOSTON (AP) — When Donald Trump won more than 52 percent of the Texas vote during the 2016 election, he pocketed all 38 of that state's Electoral College votes just as Hillary Clinton, who won California with 61 percent of the vote, swept up all 55 of that state's electors. It's a winner-take-all...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court has already heard, but not decided, a major case about political line-drawing that has the potential to reshape American politics. Now the high court is taking up another and its decision to do so is a lingering mystery that likely won’t be resolved until June. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 26, 2018 - 10:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has already heard a major case about political line-drawing that has the potential to reshape American politics. Now, before even deciding that one, the court is taking up another similar case. The arguments justices will hear Wednesday in the second case, a...
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