Supreme courts

FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2017 file photo, demonstrators carrying signs chant as they protest outside of the White House in Washington during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is headed back to a federal appeals court, three years after it was first imposed. On Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2020, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond is scheduled to hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents whose relatives have been unable to enter the U.S. because of the ban. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
January 28, 2020 - 2:36 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A federal appeals court appeared skeptical Tuesday as civil rights groups sought to allow legal challenges to President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries to move forward despite a 2018 U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding the ban. The ban, put...
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January 28, 2020 - 8:30 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — President Donald Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is going back before a federal appeals court. On Tuesday, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond will hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents...
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January 28, 2020 - 1:25 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — President Donald Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is going back before a federal appeals court. On Tuesday, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond will hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents...
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January 28, 2020 - 1:22 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — President Donald Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is going back before a federal appeals court. On Tuesday, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond will hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 27, 2020 - 5:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place new rules that could jeopardize permanent resident status for immigrants who use food stamps, Medicaid and housing vouchers. Under the new policy, immigration officials can deny green cards to legal...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 27, 2020 - 3:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place new rules that could jeopardize permanent resident status for immigrants who use food stamps, Medicaid and housing vouchers. Under the new policy, immigration officials can deny green cards to legal...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 27, 2020 - 2:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. The new policy can be used to deny green cards to immigrants over their use of public...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2019 file photo, The Supreme Court in Washington. A divided Supreme Court is allowing the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 27, 2020 - 1:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Trump administration to put in place a policy connecting the use of public benefits with whether immigrants could become permanent residents. The new policy can be used to deny green cards to immigrants over their use of public...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2017 file photo, demonstrators carrying signs chant as they protest outside of the White House in Washington during a demonstration to denounce President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel to the U.S. by citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. Trump's travel ban on travelers from predominantly Muslim countries is headed back to a federal appeals court, three years after it was first imposed. On Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2020, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond is scheduled to hear arguments in three lawsuits filed by U.S. citizens and permanent residents whose relatives have been unable to enter the U.S. because of the ban. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
January 26, 2020 - 9:25 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — After the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from several predominantly Muslim countries in 2018, the ruling appeared to shut down legal challenges that claimed the policy was rooted in anti-Muslim bias. But a federal appeals court in Richmond...
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In this image from video, presiding officer Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts admonishes the impeachment managers and president's counsel in equal terms as he speaks during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2020. Roberts asked them to "avoid speaking in a manner and using language that is not conducive to civil discourse." (Senate Television via AP)
January 24, 2020 - 3:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court doesn't have a public comment line for its own work, much less the Senate's. That hasn't stopped a fair number of social media users from urging people to call Chief Justice John Roberts at the Supreme Court and demand a fair trial or ask for witnesses or tell...
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