State courts

FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2018, file photo, the U. S. Supreme Court building stands quietly before dawn in Washington. The Constitution says you can’t be tried twice for the same offense. And yet Terance Gamble is sitting in prison today because he was prosecuted separately by Alabama and the federal government for having a gun after an earlier robbery conviction. he Supreme Court is considering Gamble’s case Thursday, Dec. 6, and the outcome could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
December 06, 2018 - 12:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments about an exception to the Constitution's ban on being tried for the same offense. The outcome could have a spillover effect on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. The justices are taking up an appeal Thursday...
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FILE- In this Friday, Aug. 20, 2010, file photo, Daniel Green, who is serving a life sentence for the July 1993 death of former NBA basketball star Michael Jordan's father James Jordan, listens to questions during an interview at the Harnett County Correctional Institute in Lillington, N.C. A North Carolina judge is scheduled to hear arguments Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the case of Green. The judge will decide whether the arguments warrant an evidentiary hearing that could lead to a new trial for Green. (AP Photo/Sara D. Davis, File)
December 04, 2018 - 11:57 pm
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) — For more than 25 years, the man identified as the triggerman in the death of Michael Jordan's father has repeatedly declared his innocence in the murder. Now he's going before a judge to lay out evidence he says proves that although he helped dispose of the body, he didn't...
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FILE- In this Friday, Aug. 20, 2010, file photo, Daniel Green, who is serving a life sentence for the July 1993 death of former NBA basketball star Michael Jordan's father James Jordan, listens to questions during an interview at the Harnett County Correctional Institute in Lillington, N.C. A North Carolina judge is scheduled to hear arguments Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the case of Green. The judge will decide whether the arguments warrant an evidentiary hearing that could lead to a new trial for Green. (AP Photo/Sara D. Davis, File)
December 04, 2018 - 11:20 am
LUMBERTON, N.C. (AP) — For more than 25 years, the man identified as the triggerman in the death of Michael Jordan's father has repeatedly declared his innocence in the murder. Now he's going before a judge to lay out evidence he says proves that although he helped dispose of the body, he didn't...
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Retired U.S. Marshal James Dawson, right, stands outside the Supreme Court with his wife Elaine Dawson, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018 in Washington. Dawson says West Virginia unlawfully discriminated against him by excluding him from preferential tax treatment given to most retired state law enforcement officers. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
December 03, 2018 - 2:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seemed inclined Monday to side with a retired U.S. marshal who argues West Virginia is discriminating against former federal law enforcement officers like him by giving a more generous tax break to former state law enforcement officers. James Dawson says West...
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December 03, 2018 - 12:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seems inclined to rule against the state of West Virginia and side with a retired U.S. marshal seeking a tax refund from the state. James Dawson says West Virginia unlawfully discriminated against him by excluding him from preferential tax treatment given to most...
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November 30, 2018 - 6:40 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Texas' attorney general sued the San Antonio police chief Friday for what he said are violations of the state's immigration law targeting "sanctuary cities" and sought millions of dollars in sanctions. The lawsuit Ken Paxton filed in state court was a rare enforcement action of...
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November 30, 2018 - 6:14 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Texas' attorney general sued the San Antonio police chief Friday for what he said are violations of the state's immigration law targeting "sanctuary cities" and sought millions of dollars in sanctions. The lawsuit Ken Paxton filed in state court was a rare enforcement action of...
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FILE - This undated photo released by the Oktibbeha County Sheriff's Office, shows Jessica Jauch. A federal judge in northern Mississippi ruled on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018, that Choctaw County and Sheriff Cloyd Halford liable for jailing Jauch for 96 days without seeing a judge in 2012. The judge is setting a trial in 2019 to determine damages, but the county and Halford are appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court, seeking to get the case thrown out. Jauch was cleared of a drug charge after a police video showed she had committed no crime. (Oktibbeha County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
November 29, 2018 - 8:05 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — There are two remaining questions left for a Mississippi woman who sued over being jailed 96 days without seeing a judge: Will the U.S. Supreme Court get involved, and if not, how much will she get paid? U.S. District Judge Sharion Aycock on Tuesday ruled that Choctaw County...
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Defendant Sergej W. arrives at the Assize Court in Dortmund, Germany, Nov. 27, 2018. The court has convicted W. on 28 counts of attempted murder in last year's attack on the Borussia Dortmund soccer team's bus. The dpa news agency reported that the defendant, who has been identified only as Sergej W. in line with German privacy rules, was sentenced to 14 years in prison by the Dortmund state court on Tuesday. (Marcel Kusch/dpa via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 10:57 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German court on Tuesday convicted a man of 28 counts of attempted murder in last year's attack on the Borussia Dortmund soccer team's bus and sentenced him to 14 years in prison. The Dortmund state court found the defendant, who has been identified only as Sergej W. in line with...
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FILE - In this April 13, 2018, file photo, packages from Internet retailers are delivered with the U.S. Mail in a apartment building mail room in Washington. Shoppers going online to score after-Thanksgiving deals and begin their holiday shopping will increasingly find they’re being charged sales tax at websites where they weren’t before. The reason: the U.S. Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko, File)
November 24, 2018 - 12:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shoppers heading online to purchase holiday gifts will find they're being charged sales tax at some websites where they weren't before. The reason: the Supreme Court. A June ruling gave states the go-ahead to require more companies to collect sales tax on online purchases. Now,...
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