State courts

FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 9:05 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A blind prisoner convicted of killing his estranged girlfriend by setting her on fire in her car was put to death Thursday in Tennessee's electric chair, becoming only the second inmate without sight to be executed in the U.S. since the reinstatement of the nation's death...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 8:39 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A blind prisoner convicted of killing his estranged girlfriend by setting her on fire in her car was put to death Thursday in Tennessee's electric chair, becoming only the second inmate without sight to be executed in the U.S. since the reinstatement of the nation's death...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 7:40 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is set to carry out what is expected to be only the second execution of a blind prisoner in the United States since the nation reinstated the death penalty in 1976. The 53-year-old inmate, Lee Hall, was scheduled to die in the electric chair Thursday evening for...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 7:37 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is set to carry out what is expected to be only the second execution of a blind prisoner in the United States since the nation reinstated the death penalty in 1976. The 53-year-old inmate, Lee Hall, was scheduled to die in the electric chair Thursday evening for...
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FILE - This Dec. 17, 2015 file photo shows a sign outside the building housing the Las Vegas Review-Journal in Las Vegas. A Nevada judge has upheld an arbitrator's finding in a hard-fought legal battle, ruling that the Review-Journal, the dominant newspaper in Las Vegas, has to submit to an audit and pay its crosstown rival and joint-operating agreement partner, the Las Vegas Sun, expenses that have been withheld in recent years. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
December 05, 2019 - 2:31 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A Nevada judge has upheld an arbitrator’s finding in an ongoing legal battle over one of the few remaining U.S. newspaper joint-operating agreements, ruling that the dominant Las Vegas Review-Journal has to submit to an audit and pay profits and expenses that its crosstown rival...
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This undated photo provided by South Carolina Department of Corrections show inmate Oscar James Fortune, who has spent 13 years in a South Carolina prison, had his murder conviction overturned because a prosecutor suggested in his closing argument all defense lawyers lie. The state's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019, that those comments were "blatantly improper" because one of the foundations of the U.S. legal system is jurors decide the truth, and that Fortune should get a new trial. (South Carolina Department of Corrections via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 2:01 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The state Supreme Court overturned the murder conviction of a man who served 13 years in a South Carolina prison because the prosecutor made comments suggesting that all defense lawyers and their clients lie. Oscar Fortune, 51, was convicted of murder in 2006 by a jury and...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 11:54 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is set to carry out what is expected to be only the second execution of a blind prisoner in the United States since the nation reinstated the death penalty in 1976. Barring an 11th-hour stay, 53-year-old inmate Lee Hall is scheduled to die in the electric chair...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 4:20 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced Wednesday that he won't stop the state from putting a blind inmate to death in the electric chair later this week, clearing the way for the execution unless a federal court intervenes. Lee Hall, a 53-year-old inmate who became blind from...
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This Dec. 15, 2016 photo shows a slag pile of mining waste in Anaconda, Mont. Environmental regulators have put a halt to a Montana business association’s sale of sandwich bags of mining waste advertised as a “Bag O’Slag.” Environmental Protection Agency officials overseeing the Superfund cleanup of pollution from decades of smelter operations in Anaconda came across the potentially toxic tchotchkes for sale by the city’s chamber of commerce. The slag contains small amounts of arsenic and lead. Mary Johnston, the chamber’s executive director, said Monday, Nov. 18, 2019 the EPA asked them to stop selling the black slag in a re-sealable bag and gave them some alternatives. (AP Photo/Matt Volz)
December 03, 2019 - 4:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seemed inclined Tuesday to rule that Montana homeowners who are seeking additional cleanup of arsenic left over from years of copper smelting need the permission of the Environmental Protection Agency. That outcome would be a loss for the homeowners and a win for...
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This Dec. 15, 2016 photo shows a slag pile of mining waste in Anaconda, Mont. Environmental regulators have put a halt to a Montana business association’s sale of sandwich bags of mining waste advertised as a “Bag O’Slag.” Environmental Protection Agency officials overseeing the Superfund cleanup of pollution from decades of smelter operations in Anaconda came across the potentially toxic tchotchkes for sale by the city’s chamber of commerce. The slag contains small amounts of arsenic and lead. Mary Johnston, the chamber’s executive director, said Monday, Nov. 18, 2019 the EPA asked them to stop selling the black slag in a re-sealable bag and gave them some alternatives. (AP Photo/Matt Volz)
December 03, 2019 - 3:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seemed inclined Tuesday to rule that Montana homeowners who are seeking additional cleanup of arsenic left over from years of copper smelting need the permission of the Environmental Protection Agency. That outcome would be a loss for the homeowners and a win for...
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