State courts

FILE - This photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Michael Brandon Samra. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey refused a reprieve for Samra, an inmate set for execution Thursday, May 16, 2019, night for a quadruple killing that occurred after a dispute over a pickup truck, the prisoner's lawyer said. (Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)
May 16, 2019 - 9:41 pm
ATMORE, Ala. (AP) — A man condemned for his role in a quadruple killing that followed a dispute over a pickup truck was put to death Thursday in Alabama after declining to make any last-minute appeals. Michael Brandon Samra, 41, was pronounced dead at 7:33 p.m. following a three-drug lethal...
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FILE - This photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Michael Brandon Samra. His attorney has asked the governor to halt his Thursday, May 16, 2019 lethal injection while a Kentucky court weighs the appropriateness of the death penalty for people who were under 21 at the time of their crimes. Samra was 19 when he participated in the 1997 slayings in Shelby County of four people, including two children. (Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)
May 16, 2019 - 12:09 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey refused a reprieve for an inmate set for execution Thursday night for a quadruple killing that occurred after a dispute over a pickup truck, the prisoner's lawyer said. The decision apparently cleared the way for Michael Brandon Samra to be put to death...
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FILE - This photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Michael Brandon Samra. His attorney has asked the governor to halt his Thursday, May 16, 2019 lethal injection while a Kentucky court weighs the appropriateness of the death penalty for people who were under 21 at the time of their crimes. Samra was 19 when he participated in the 1997 slayings in Shelby County of four people, including two children. (Alabama Department of Corrections via AP)
May 16, 2019 - 11:34 am
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The lawyer for an Alabama inmate set for lethal injection in a quadruple killing that occurred after a dispute over a pickup truck said he doesn't plan last-minute appeals to block the execution set for Thursday night. Steven Sears told The Associated Press in an email that...
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This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that virtually outlaws abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Ala. Republicans who support the measure hope challenges to the law will be used by conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion nationwide. (Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP)
May 16, 2019 - 8:44 am
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's Republican governor has signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases. "To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief that...
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This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that virtually outlaws abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Ala. Republicans who support the measure hope challenges to the law will be used by conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion nationwide. (Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 10:01 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's Republican governor signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation Wednesday, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases. "To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief...
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This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that virtually outlaws abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Ala. Republicans who support the measure hope challenges to the law will be used by conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion nationwide. (Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 9:17 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's Republican governor signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation Wednesday, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases. "To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief...
Read More
This photograph released by the state shows Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signing a bill that virtually outlaws abortion in the state on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Montgomery, Ala. Republicans who support the measure hope challenges to the law will be used by conservative justices on the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion nationwide. (Hal Yeager/Alabama Governor's Office via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 7:10 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's Republican governor signed the most stringent abortion legislation in the nation Wednesday, making performing an abortion a felony in nearly all cases. "To the bill's many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians' deeply held belief...
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FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2019, file photo, containers of Roundup are displayed on a store shelf in San Francisco. A Northern California jury ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.05 billion to a couple who claimed the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The Oakland jury on Monday, May 13, 2019, delivered Monsanto's third such loss in California since August. Alva and Alberta Pilliod claimed they used Roundup for more than 30 years to landscape. They were both diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Monsanto owner Bayer said it would appeal. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File)
May 13, 2019 - 10:41 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury on Monday ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.055 billion to a couple claiming that the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The jury's verdict is the third such courtroom loss for Monsanto in California since August...
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FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2019, file photo, containers of Roundup are displayed on a store shelf in San Francisco. A Northern California jury ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.05 billion to a couple who claimed the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The Oakland jury on Monday, May 13, 2019, delivered Monsanto's third such loss in California since August. Alva and Alberta Pilliod claimed they used Roundup for more than 30 years to landscape. They were both diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Monsanto owner Bayer said it would appeal. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File)
May 13, 2019 - 9:57 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury on Monday ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.055 billion to a couple claiming that the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The jury's verdict is the third such courtroom loss for Monsanto in California since August...
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FILE - In this Feb. 24, 2019, file photo, containers of Roundup are displayed on a store shelf in San Francisco. A Northern California jury ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.05 billion to a couple who claimed the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The Oakland jury on Monday, May 13, 2019, delivered Monsanto's third such loss in California since August. Alva and Alberta Pilliod claimed they used Roundup for more than 30 years to landscape. They were both diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Monsanto owner Bayer said it would appeal. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File)
May 13, 2019 - 7:13 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury on Monday ordered agribusiness giant Monsanto Co. to pay a combined $2.055 billion to a couple claiming that the company's popular weed killer Roundup Ready caused their cancers. The jury's verdict is third such courtroom loss for Monsanto in California since August, but...
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