Software

FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 4:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 4:20 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory...
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FILE- In this March 29, 2018, file photo, the logo for Facebook appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square. In itself, Facebook’s latest privacy bug doesn’t sound like a big deal. But it’s part of a pattern for the social media giant that shows just how much data it has on its 2.27 billion users and how often these sorts of slipups happen. The company said Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 that software bug may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than users had granted permission for. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 14, 2018 - 1:22 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook said Friday that a software bug affecting nearly 7 million users may have exposed a broader set of photos to app developers than what those users intended. Although this doesn't mean the photos were actually seen by anyone, the revelation of the bug offers another reminder...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018, file photo, the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 is shown in New York. Retailers are taking back some control of the store experience with smartphone app features that let customers do things like scan and pay, as well as download digital maps. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
December 12, 2018 - 11:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just a few years ago, retailers considered smartphones the enemy of the in-store experience they were trying to create. Customers often whipped out their device to compare prices online and then walked out of the store to buy the same product elsewhere. Today, stores are taking...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 12, 2018 - 2:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. lawmakers' grilling of Google CEO Sundar Pichai may have sounded like a broken record, but it amplified the prickly issues facing tech companies as Democrats prepare to take control of the House next month. The 3 1/2-hour hearing Tuesday hit upon familiar themes — online...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 4:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Google CEO Sundar Pichai — and other tech executives who may be watching — got hints Tuesday of what issues they can expect to face as Democrats take control of the House in three weeks. While Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee grilled Pichai on what they perceive as...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 1:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Google CEO Sundar Pichai — and other tech executives who may be watching — got hints Tuesday of what issues they can expect to face as Democrats take control of the House in three weeks. While Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee grilled Pichai on what they perceive as...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai appears before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Pichai angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments' manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Questions on privacy, data collection, China, Russia —and especially political bias — dominated Google CEO Sundar Pichai's grilling before Congress Tuesday. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy opened the House Judiciary Committee hearing by noting a "widening gap of distrust"...
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Google CEO Sundar Pichai arrives to testify before the House Judiciary Committee to be questioned about the internet giant's privacy security and data collection, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 11, 2018 - 12:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Google CEO before Congress (all times local): 12:10 p.m. Google CEO Sundar Pichai is reiterating the company's position that it has no plans "right now" to launch a censored search engine in China. That, of course, leaves the option open to launch one down the road...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2018, file photo Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, speaks during a conversation as part of the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Pichai's appearance Tuesday, Dec. 11, before the House Judiciary Committee comes after he angered members of a Senate panel in September by declining their invitation to testify about foreign governments’ manipulation of online services to sway U.S. political elections. Pichai's no-show at that hearing was marked by an empty chair for Google alongside the Facebook and Twitter executives who appeared and were interrogated. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)
December 11, 2018 - 10:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy kicked off a congressional grilling of Google CEO Sundar Pichai by noting a "widening gap of distrust" between tech companies and the American people. McCarthy, a California Republican, asked whether tech companies are "serving as instruments...
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