Sled dog racing

FILE - In this March 2, 2019, file photo, defending champion Joar Lefseth Ulsom runs his team down Fourth Ave during the ceremonial start of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Anchorage, Alaska. Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has joined a new global circuit of long-distance sled dog racing. Officials of the 1,000-mile race have teamed up with Norway pet food supplement company and series creator, Aker BioMarine, and other races in Minnesota, Norway and Russia for the inaugural QRILL Pet Arctic World Series, or QPAWS, next year. (AP Photo/Michael Dinneen, File)
October 24, 2019 - 5:59 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska's famed Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has joined a new global partnership billed as the World Series of long-distance sled dog racing and aimed at bringing more fans to the cold-weather sport. The Iditarod has teamed up with Norway pet food supplement company and...
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FILE - In this March 8, 2018 file photo Musher Ramey Smyth approaches Shageluk, Alaska, as rain falls and some sun hits the area during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. PETA is the biggest critic of the world's most famous sled dog race, but new Iditarod CEO Rob Urbach has started discussions with the animal rights group and plans a sit-down meeting with PETA Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in Los Angeles. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP, File)
October 16, 2019 - 6:24 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The new head of Alaska's Iditarod plans to meet with a leader of an animal welfare group that's devoted to ending the world's most famous sled dog race, which it sees as a cruel, deadly event for its canine participants. Organizers of the 1,000-mile wilderness trek have for...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 8:56 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 4:34 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 3:03 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 12:15 pm
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 11:23 am
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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In this Aug. 16, 2019, photo, large Icebergs float away as the sun rises near Kulusuk, Greenland. Scientists are hard at work, trying to understand the alarmingly rapid melting of the ice. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
August 20, 2019 - 10:32 am
HELHEIM GLACIER, Greenland (AP) — This is where Earth's refrigerator door is left open, where glaciers dwindle and seas begin to rise. New York University air and ocean scientist David Holland, who is tracking what's happening in Greenland from both above and below, calls it "the end of the planet...
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FILE - In this March 13, 2019, file photo, Jessie Royer passes icebergs in open water on Norton Sound as she approaches Nome, Alaska, in the Iditarod trail sled dog race. As the new head of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Rob Urbach will have to overcome dwindling sponsorships, dog deaths, a recent dog-doping scandal and animal rights protests. With all that drama, it seems fitting Urbach was introduced to the sport by soap opera actress Susan Lucci. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News via AP, File)
July 01, 2019 - 7:27 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — As the new head of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Rob Urbach will have to overcome dwindling sponsorships, dog deaths, a recent dog-doping scandal and animal rights protests. With all that drama, it seems fitting Urbach, 57, became hooked on the sport thanks to soap...
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This Wednesday, March 20, 2019, photo shows Iditarod musher Nicolas Petit posing with two of his dogs in Anchorage, Alaska. The Frenchman Petit was in the lead of this year's race but his dog team quit running after he yelled at Joey, right, to stop picking on Danny, left. Petit says that isn't the reason the dogs quit running; instead, they quit about the same point the team got lost in a blizzard in the 2018 race. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)
March 22, 2019 - 1:10 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Iditarod musher who was hours ahead in the Alaska wilderness race when his dogs refused to keep running dismissed critics who say he ran them too hard and chalked it up to a bad memory that spooked them. The team stopped last week after Frenchman Nicolas Petit yelled at...
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