Seniors' health

This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 3:10 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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This microscope image shows the 46 human chromosomes, blue, with telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. Research released on Tuesday, July 16, 2019 offers some of the first biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease, and how this most common form of dementia varies by gender. (Hesed Padilla-Nash, Thomas Ried/National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health via AP)
July 16, 2019 - 2:45 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — New research gives some biological clues to why women may be more likely than men to develop Alzheimer's disease and how this most common form of dementia varies by sex. At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles on Tuesday, scientists offered evidence...
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In this July 9, 2019 photo, Dr. Jori Fleisher, neurologist, examines Thomas Doyle, 66, at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Doyle, 66, hopes blood tests may someday replace the invasive diagnostic testing he endured to be diagnosed 4.5 years ago with Lewy body dementia. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
July 15, 2019 - 1:19 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a long-sought goal — a blood test to screen people for possible signs of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia. On Monday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference, half a dozen research groups gave new results on various...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 1:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:35 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 12:21 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., speaks during the National Education Association Strong Public Schools Presidential Forum in Houston. Klobuchar has a new plan to help seniors that includes more support for people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers. It’s an issue that’s personal for the Minnesota senator, whose 91-year-old father is in a memory care facility. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
July 12, 2019 - 6:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar (KLOH'-buh-shar) has a new plan to help seniors that includes more support for people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. It's an issue that's personal for the Minnesota senator, whose 91-year-old father is in a memory...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar speaks to reporters during the West Des Moines Democrats' annual picnic, Wednesday, July 3, 2019, in West Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
July 12, 2019 - 6:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar (KLOH'-buh-shar) has a new plan to help seniors that includes more support for people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. It's an issue that's personal for the Minnesota senator, whose 91-year-old father is in a memory...
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FILE- In this Feb. 12, 2019, file photo pedestrians pass beneath City Hall in Philadelphia. Nearly one-quarter of Americans say they never plan to retire, according to a poll that suggests a disconnect between individuals’ retirement plans and the realities of aging in the workforce. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
July 07, 2019 - 7:30 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Nearly one-quarter of Americans say they never plan to retire, according to a poll that suggests a disconnection between individuals' retirement plans and the realities of aging in the workforce. Experts say illness, injury, layoffs and caregiving responsibilities often force older...
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Results of AP-NORC poll on attitudes of workers toward retirement.;
July 07, 2019 - 8:19 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Nearly one-quarter of Americans say they never plan to retire, according to a poll that suggests a disconnection between individuals' retirement plans and the realities of aging in the workforce. Experts say illness, injury, layoffs and caregiving responsibilities often force older...
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