Scientific publishing

A man wears protective face masks stands in front of TV screens broadcasting Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivering a speech in Hong Kong, Monday, Feb. 3, 2020. Lam says the city will shut almost all land and sea border control points to the mainland from midnight to stem the spread of the novel coronavirus from China. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
February 03, 2020 - 7:02 am
BEIJING (AP) — The Latest on the outbreak of a new virus from China (all times local): 7 p.m. Chinese scientists say they have more evidence that the new virus that recently emerged in China likely originated in bats. In two papers published Monday in the journal Nature, scientists report that...
Read More
Passengers board buses after arriving on an airplane carrying U.S. citizens being evacuated from Wuhan, China, at March Air Reserve Base in Riverside, Calif. Jan. 29, 2020. The passengers will undergo additional screenings in California and be placed in temporary housing. Officials have not said how long they will stay there. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
January 29, 2020 - 5:16 pm
BEIJING (AP) — The Latest on the outbreak of a new virus from China that has sickened thousands of people and killed more than 100: 6:15 a.m. In a report published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine, Chinese scientists describe evidence that the new virus has spread person-to-person...
Read More
In this Nov. 11, 2016, photo provided by the Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a Chinese paddlefish specimen made in 1990 is seen on display at the Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, China. The Chinese paddlefish's sharp, protruding snout made it one of the largest freshwater species in the world. Since scientists declared it extinct in a research paper published last week, Chinese internet users media outlets have been paying tribute to the hefty creature. (Museum of Hydrobiological Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 10, 2020 - 5:22 am
BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese paddlefish's sharp, protruding snout made it one of the largest freshwater species in the world. Since scientists declared it extinct in a research paper published last week, Chinese internet users media outlets have been paying tribute to the hefty creature. “It's...
Read More
This image provided by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a collection of lung scans of 20 monkeys who were exposed to tuberculosis after receiving different forms of a TB vaccine. Monkeys in the top row received skin-deep shots, and those in the bottom row were given intravenous injections. The intravenous vaccine protected far better, as shown by TB-caused inflammation seen in red and yellow. (JoAnne Flynn, Alexander White and Pauline Maiello/Pitt; Mario Roederer/NIAID via AP)
January 01, 2020 - 1:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they’ve figured out how to make a century-old tuberculosis vaccine far more protective: Simply give the shot a different way. In a study with monkeys, injecting the vaccine straight into the bloodstream dramatically improved its effectiveness over today's skin-...
Read More
In this 2019 photo provided by the University of Iowa, Professor Russell Ciochon holds a cast of a Homo erectus skull at his lab in Iowa City. In a report released Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019 by the journal Nature, scientists conclude that remains found in Java, Indonesia are between 108,000 and 117,000 years old. Homo erectus is generally considered an ancestor of our species. (Tim Schoon/University of Iowa via AP)
December 18, 2019 - 1:19 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they have finally calculated the age of the youngest known remains of Homo erectus, which is generally considered an ancestor of our species. The fossilized skull fragments and other bones were uncovered on the Indonesian island of Java in the 1930s. Determining their...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:00 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
Read More
This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 12, 2019 - 2:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 01, 2019 - 1:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
Read More
December 01, 2019 - 10:09 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
Read More

Pages