Scientific publishing

FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, a neighborhood near Addicks Reservoir is flooded by rain from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston. A new study finds that FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently. Harris County, Texas, where Houston is located, which, according to its flood control district, undergoes a major flood about every two years, has used FEMA’s buyout programs more than any other county, the researchers said. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
October 09, 2019 - 2:30 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently, a new study finds. The reason is probably that better-off local governments have the resources to apply for...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo, a neighborhood near Addicks Reservoir is flooded by rain from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston. A new study finds that FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood frequently. Harris County, Texas, where Houston is located, which, according to its flood control district, undergoes a major flood about every two years, has used FEMA’s buyout programs more than any other county, the researchers said. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)
October 09, 2019 - 2:26 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A new study finds that FEMA buys flood-prone homes more often in wealthy, populous counties than in poor, rural areas, even though lower-income rural areas may be more likely to flood. Researchers from Florida, Delaware and California say this is probably because better-off local...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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This GOES-16, GeoColor satellite image taken Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, at 17:10 UTC and provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Dorian moving off the east coast of Florida in the Atlantic Ocean. (NOAA via AP)
September 03, 2019 - 3:27 pm
Hurricane Dorian is finally moving. But for a day-and-half it just sat on and pounded Grand Bahama Island because nothing high up in the atmosphere was making it budge. That meteorological gridlock, which slows or stalls storms, is happening more often in a warming world, studies show. Before...
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This undated photo provided by Loren Davis in August 2019 shows an overview of the Cooper's Ferry canyon in western Idaho. In a report released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, scientists say they’ve found artifacts in the area that indicate people were living here around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. (Loren Davis via AP)
August 29, 2019 - 2:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found artifacts in Idaho that indicate people were living there around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. The discovery also points to Japan as a possible origin or influence...
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This undated photo provided by Loren Davis in August 2019 shows an overview of the Cooper's Ferry canyon in western Idaho. In a report released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, scientists say they’ve found artifacts in the area that indicate people were living here around 16,000 years ago, providing new evidence that the first Americans entered their new home by following the Pacific Coast. (Loren Davis via AP)
August 29, 2019 - 2:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Some artifacts found in western Idaho suggest that people were living there about 16,000 years ago. They provide new evidence that the first Americans arrived by following the Pacific Coast. And they point to Japan as a possible origin or influence for the migration. Scientists...
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This July 13, 2019 photo provided by Guangzhou Wolbaki Biotech shows male Aedes albopictus mosquitoes in a container at the company's lab in Guangzhou, China, prepared for release. Researchers zapped the insects with a small dose of radiation and infected them with a virus-fighting bacterium called Wolbachia. Males and female mosquitoes with different types of Wolbachia won’t have young that survive. So researchers intentionally infect males with a strain not found in the area and then release the insects. (Guangzhou Wolbaki Biotech via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 2:30 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they nearly eliminated disease-carrying mosquitoes on two islands in China using a new technique. The downside: It may not be practical for larger areas and may cost a lot of money. In the experiment, researchers targeted Asian tiger mosquitoes, invasive white-striped...
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This undated photo provided by researchers in June 2019 shows an example of a transparent wallet used in an experiment to test how likely people are to return a lost wallet. "The evidence suggests that people tend to care about the welfare of others, and they have an aversion to seeing themselves as a thief," said Alain Cohn of the University of Michigan, one author who reported the results Thursday, June 20, 2019 in the journal Science. (Christian Zünd via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 2:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study says people are more likely to return a lost wallet if it contains money than if it doesn't. And the more cash, the better. Researchers planted more than 17,000 supposedly lost wallets in 40 countries, and kept track of how often somebody contacted the supposed owners...
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This Jan. 3 1976 photo made by the National Reconnaissance Office shows Mount Everest at center. This and other once-classified Cold War era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. (National Reconnaissance Office via AP)
June 19, 2019 - 2:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cold War-era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. The Asian mountain range, which includes Mount Everest, has been losing ice at a rate of about 1% a year since 2000, according to a study...
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