Scientific ethics

In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 4:31 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 6:23 am
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 5:55 am
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 5:47 am
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
Read More
In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 4:35 am
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
Read More
September 16, 2019 - 6:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Chinese government employee was arrested Monday after the Justice Department linked him to a visa fraud scheme intended to help others enter the United States to recruit research talent. Zhongsan Liu, 57, was charged in federal court in Manhattan with one count of conspiracy to...
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National Weather Service Director Louis Uccellini addresses a meeting of the National Weather Association in Huntsville, Ala., Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Uccellini defended forecasters who contradicted President Donald Trump's claim that Hurricane Dorian posed a threat to Alabama as it approached the United States. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)
September 09, 2019 - 2:37 pm
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — The acting chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said his agency likely violated its scientific integrity rules last week when it publicly chastised a weather office that contradicted President Donald Trump's claim that Hurricane Dorian...
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National Weather Service Director Louis Uccellini addresses a meeting of the National Weather Association in Huntsville, Ala., Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Uccellini defended forecasters who contradicted President Donald Trump's claim that Hurricane Dorian posed a threat to Alabama as it approached the United States. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)
September 09, 2019 - 2:24 pm
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — The acting chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said his agency likely violated its scientific integrity rules last week when it publicly chastised a weather office that contradicted President Donald Trump's claim that Hurricane Dorian...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 7:45 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined inside a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture outside,...
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In this May 13, 2019, photo, Bella the vervet monkey looks at the camera at Primates Inc., in Westfield, Wis. Besides Bella, previously a pet, the sanctuary has five rhesus macaque monkeys that were previously used in medical research. More research labs are retiring primates to sanctuaries like Primates Inc., a 17-acre rural compound in central Wisconsin, where they can live their remaining years after research studies are done, according to sanctuaries and researchers. (AP Photo/Carrie Antlfinger)
June 13, 2019 - 3:37 am
WESTFIELD, Wis. (AP) — Izzle, Timon, Batman, River and Mars spent years confined to inside of a lab, their lives devoted to being tested for the benefit of human health. But these rhesus macaques have paid their dues and are now living in retirement — in larger enclosures that let them venture...
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