Science

June 21, 2018 - 11:22 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Arkansas Supreme Court on Thursday cleared the way for the state to launch its medical marijuana program, reversing and dismissing a judge's ruling that prevented officials from issuing the first license for businesses to grow the drug. Pulaski County Judge Wendell...
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FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2018, file photo, a medical assistant at a community health center gives a patient a flu shot in Seattle. A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday, June 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
June 20, 2018 - 1:41 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A newer kind of flu vaccine worked a little bit better in seniors this past winter than traditional shots, the government reported Wednesday. Overall, flu vaccines barely worked at all in keeping people 65 and older out of the hospital, with roughly 24 percent effectiveness. The...
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Noa Ovadia, left, and Dan Zafrir, right, prepare for their debate against the IBM Project Debater, Monday, June 18, 2018, in San Francisco. IBM on Monday will pit a computer against two human debaters in the first public demonstration of artificial intelligence technology it's been working on for more than five years. The system, called Project Debater, is designed to be able to listen to an argument, then respond in a natural-sounding way, after pulling in evidence it collects from Wikipedia, journals, newspapers and other sources to make its point. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
June 19, 2018 - 2:14 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — An argumentative computer proved formidable against two human debaters as IBM gave its first public demonstration of new artificial intelligence technology it's been working on for more than five years. The new skills show that computers are getting better at mastering human...
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FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2008, file photo, a drilling rig used to extract natural gas from the Marcellus Shale, located on a hill above a pond on John Dunn's farm in the Washington County borough of Houston, Pa. New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
June 18, 2018 - 5:57 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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FILE – In this Oct. 29, 2008, file photo, a drilling rig used to extract natural gas from the Marcellus Shale, located on a hill above a pond on John Dunn's farm in the Washington County borough of Houston, Pa. New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
June 18, 2018 - 5:00 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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June 18, 2018 - 4:55 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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June 18, 2018 - 4:16 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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June 13, 2018 - 10:33 am
ONONDAGA, N.Y. (AP) — Students from Japan and a researcher from New Zealand are among the scientists and hobbyists flocking to central New York for rare sightings of a big bug. The area's cicada (sih-KAY'-duh) brood emerges once every 17 years. The Post-Standard says the eastern U.S. is one of...
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This undated photo provided by Rutgers University shows three Longhorned ticks: from left, a fully engorged female, a partial engorged female, and an engorged nymph. A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle of the continent. (Jim Occi/Rutgers University via AP)
June 12, 2018 - 10:12 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, nor how it made its way to the middle...
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Most of the Kapoho area including the tide pools is now covered in fresh lava with few properties still intact as the Kilauea Volcano lower east rift zone eruption continues on Wednesday, June 6, 2018, in Pahoa, Hawaii. (AP Photo/LE Baskow)
June 07, 2018 - 10:11 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Lava from the Kilauea volcano that flowed into Kapoho Bay has created nearly a mile of new land and officials with the U.S. Geological Survey said Thursday the flow is still very active and there's no way to know when the eruption will end or if more lava-spewing vents will open...
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