School shootings

FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 12:39 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 11:05 am
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their background to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years gunmen...
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In this Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, photo, the Permian High School football team practices in Odessa, Texas. Far more than the final score will be on the line as two grief-stricken cities shaken by mass shootings weeks apart turn to the proud Texas tradition of high school football as part of the healing process. Perhaps no team symbolizes the tradition more than Permian, which are hosting Thursday's game in Odessa against the Franklin High School Cougars from El Paso. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 04, 2019 - 6:04 pm
Far more than the final score will be on the line as two grief-stricken cities shaken by mass shootings weeks apart turn to the proud Texas tradition of high school football as part of the healing process. Perhaps no team symbolizes this rite of fall in the state more than the Permian High School...
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CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 10:04 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage "was on a long spiral of going down" and had been fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2013, file photo, a stag arms AR-15 rifle with 30 round, left, and 10 round magazines is displayed in New Britain, Conn. High-capacity magazines have been a common denominator in several mass killings in recent years, and lawmakers are making a renewed push to ban them. Nine states have passed laws restricting magazine capacity to 10 to 15 bullets, and the Democratic-led Congress is returning early from its summer recess this week to consider a similar ban at the federal level. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
September 02, 2019 - 8:46 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Lawmakers around the country are making a renewed push to ban high-capacity magazines that gunmen have used in many recent massacres, allowing them to inflict mass casualties at a startling rate before police can stop the carnage. Nine states have passed laws restricting magazine...
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CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 7:34 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage "was on a long spiral of going down" and had been fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on...
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CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 6:48 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage "was on a long spiral of going down" and had been fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on...
Read More
CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 6:01 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage "was on a long spiral of going down" and had been fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on...
Read More
CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 5:51 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a West Texas rampage had been "on a long spiral down" and was fired from his oil services job the morning he killed seven people, calling 911 both before and after the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Officers killed 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator on Saturday...
Read More
CORRECTS SPELLING OF VICTIM'S FIRST NAME TO LEILAH INSTEAD OF LEILA - High School students Celeste Lujan, left, and Yasmin Natera mourn their friend Leilah Hernandez, one of the victims of the Saturday shooting in Odessa, at a memorial service Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
September 02, 2019 - 3:41 pm
ODESSA, Texas (AP) — The gunman in a spate of violence after a routine traffic stop in West Texas had just been fired from his job and called both police and the FBI before the shooting began, authorities said Monday. Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke said 36-year-old Seth Aaron Ator had been fired...
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