School shootings

FILE - This undated file photo released by the Long Beach, Calif., Police Department shows weapons and ammunition seized from a cook at a Los Angeles-area hotel who allegedly threatened a mass shooting. Rodolfo Montoya was arrested Tuesday, Aug. 20, a day after allegedly telling a co-worker at the Long Beach Marriott he planned to shoot fellow workers and others. Experts say media coverage of the shootings makes the public more prone to inform on worrisome relatives or neighbors in an attempt to thwart more shootings. Following the high-profile shootings in California and Texas and Ohio, tips to the FBI rose by about 15,000 each week. (Long Beach Police Department via AP, File)
September 21, 2019 - 2:25 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It had all the makings of a massacre. Six guns, including a Colt AR-15 rifle. About 1,000 rounds of ammunition. A bulletproof vest. And an angry Southern California man who threated to kill his co-workers at a hotel and its guests. But a concerned colleague intervened, alerting...
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FILE - This undated file photo released by the Long Beach, Calif., Police Department shows weapons and ammunition seized from a cook at a Los Angeles-area hotel who allegedly threatened a mass shooting. Rodolfo Montoya was arrested Tuesday, Aug. 20, a day after allegedly telling a co-worker at the Long Beach Marriott he planned to shoot fellow workers and others. Experts say media coverage of the shootings makes the public more prone to inform on worrisome relatives or neighbors in an attempt to thwart more shootings. Following the high-profile shootings in California and Texas and Ohio, tips to the FBI rose by about 15,000 each week. (Long Beach Police Department via AP, File)
September 21, 2019 - 12:32 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It had all the makings of a massacre. Six guns, including a Colt AR-15 rifle. About 1,000 rounds of ammunition. A bulletproof vest. And an angry Southern California man who threated to kill his co-workers at a hotel and its guests. But a concerned colleague intervened, alerting...
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FILE - This undated file photo released by the Long Beach, Calif., Police Department shows weapons and ammunition seized from a cook at a Los Angeles-area hotel who allegedly threatened a mass shooting. Rodolfo Montoya was arrested Tuesday, Aug. 20, a day after allegedly telling a co-worker at the Long Beach Marriott he planned to shoot fellow workers and others. Experts say media coverage of the shootings makes the public more prone to inform on worrisome relatives or neighbors in an attempt to thwart more shootings. Following the high-profile shootings in California and Texas and Ohio, tips to the FBI rose by about 15,000 each week. (Long Beach Police Department via AP, File)
September 21, 2019 - 10:48 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It had all the makings of a massacre. Six guns, including a Colt AR-15 rifle. About 1,000 rounds of ammunition. A bulletproof vest. And an angry Southern California man who threated to kill his co-workers at a hotel and its guests. But a concerned colleague intervened, alerting...
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FILE - This April 30, 2019, file booking photo provided by Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office shows Trystan Andrew Terrell. The Mecklenburg County District Attorney’s office says Trystan Andrew Terrell will appear for an arraignment on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019 at around 2 p.m. (Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
September 19, 2019 - 4:08 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The man charged with killing two North Carolina university students and wounding four others in their classroom in April pleaded guilty Thursday to two counts of first-degree murder. Trystan Andrew Terrell also pleaded guilty Thursday to four counts of attempted murder and...
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FILE - This April 30, 2019, file booking photo provided by Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office shows Trystan Andrew Terrell. The Mecklenburg County District Attorney’s office says Trystan Andrew Terrell will appear for an arraignment on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019 at around 2 p.m. (Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
September 19, 2019 - 3:12 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The man charged with killing two North Carolina university students and wounding four others in their classroom in April pleaded guilty Thursday to two counts of first-degree murder. Trystan Andrew Terrell also pleaded guilty Thursday to four counts of attempted murder and...
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In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Jessica Moloney, holding her 6-month-old daughter Amelia, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 12:44 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
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In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Monica Davis, parent of an elementary school student, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 9:03 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
Read More
In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Monica Davis, parent of an elementary school student, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 6:19 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 6:38 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 3:22 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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