School safety

September 10, 2019 - 10:08 am
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Florida boy who was bullied over his homemade University of Tennessee shirt now has fans of his own. News outlets report the Knoxville school is now selling shirts featuring the boy's hand-drawn design, which also has been painted onto the Rock , a longtime 97.5 ton campus...
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In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Jessica Moloney, holding her 6-month-old daughter Amelia, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 12:44 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
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In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Monica Davis, parent of an elementary school student, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 9:03 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
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In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Monica Davis, parent of an elementary school student, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 6:19 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly...
Read More
In this Aug. 22, 2019 photo, Monica Davis, parent of an elementary school student, expresses her displeasure at a meeting at Highland High School in Marengo, Ohio, about how the school board handled a recent incident where a child had access to a gun, pointed it at another student, and that parents weren't informed. Schools across the country have faced a backlash for favoring privacy over telling parents when there are threats in their children’s classrooms. Safety experts advise schools to tell parents as much as they can as soon as they can about threats. (Fred Squillante/The Columbus Dispatch via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 6:17 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Tell as much as you can as soon as you can. That's the advice of safety experts when discussing what information about school threats to convey to parents and the rest of the community. In districts around the country, schools have faced criticism for favoring privacy over...
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Students wearing mask hold hands to surround St. Stephen's Girls' College in Hong Kong, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Thousands of demonstrators in Hong Kong urged President Donald Trump to "liberate" the semiautonomous Chinese territory during a peaceful march to the U.S. Consulate on Sunday, but violence broke out later in the business and retail district as police fired tear gas after protesters vandalized subway stations, set fires and blocked traffic. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
September 09, 2019 - 4:56 am
HONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of students formed human chains outside schools across Hong Kong on Monday to show solidarity to push for democratic reforms after violent weekend clashes in the semiautonomous Chinese territory. The silent protest comes as the Hong Kong government condemned the "illegal...
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Students wearing mask hold hands to surround St. Stephen's Girls' College in Hong Kong, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Thousands of demonstrators in Hong Kong urged President Donald Trump to "liberate" the semiautonomous Chinese territory during a peaceful march to the U.S. Consulate on Sunday, but violence broke out later in the business and retail district as police fired tear gas after protesters vandalized subway stations, set fires and blocked traffic. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
September 08, 2019 - 11:52 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of students are forming human chains in schools across Hong Kong to show solidarity after violent weekend clashes to push for democratic reforms in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. The silent protest Monday comes as the Hong Kong government condemned the "illegal...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 6:38 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 3:22 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
Read More
FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 12:39 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
Read More

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