Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting

December 03, 2019 - 1:42 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut’s treasurer, who oversees $37 billion in public pension funds, announced plans Tuesday to reallocate $30 million worth of shares in civilian firearm manufacturer securities while banning similar future investments and creating incentives for banks and financial...
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FILE - In this March 1, 2018 file photo, a light advertising Remington products hangs from the ceiling at Duke's Sport Shop in New Castle, Pa. For years, the gun industry has been immune from most lawsuits, but a recent ruling allowing families of victims in the Newton school shooting to challenge the way an AR-15 used by the shooter was marketed is upending that longstanding roadblock. The U.S. Supreme Court recently rejected efforts by gunmaker Remington to quash the lawsuit, allowing it to continue to be heard in Connecticut courts.(AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
November 16, 2019 - 3:14 pm
A recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court has upended a longstanding legal roadblock that has given the gun industry far-reaching immunity from lawsuits in the aftermath of mass killings. The court this week allowed families of victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre to sue the maker of the...
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FILE - In this March 1, 2018 file photo, a light advertising Remington products hangs from the ceiling at Duke's Sport Shop in New Castle, Pa. For years, the gun industry has been immune from most lawsuits, but a recent ruling allowing families of victims in the Newton school shooting to challenge the way an AR-15 used by the shooter was marketed is upending that longstanding roadblock. The U.S. Supreme Court recently rejected efforts by gunmaker Remington to quash the lawsuit, allowing it to continue to be heard in Connecticut courts.(AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
November 16, 2019 - 1:12 pm
A recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court has upended a longstanding legal roadblock that has given the gun industry far-reaching immunity from lawsuits in the aftermath of mass killings. The court this week allowed families of victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook school massacre to sue the maker of the...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds up a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model of gun used by Adam Lanza in the Sandy Hook School shooting, for a demonstration during a hearing of a legislative subcommittee reviewing gun laws, at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. The Supreme Court said Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
November 12, 2019 - 2:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. The justices rejected an appeal from Remington Arms, which argued it should be...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds up a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model of gun used by Adam Lanza in the Sandy Hook School shooting, for a demonstration during a hearing of a legislative subcommittee reviewing gun laws, at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. The Supreme Court said Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
November 12, 2019 - 1:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. The justices rejected an appeal from Remington Arms, which argued it should be...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2013, file photo, firearms training unit Detective Barbara J. Mattson, of the Connecticut State Police, holds up a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle, the same make and model of gun used by Adam Lanza in the Sandy Hook School shooting, for a demonstration during a hearing of a legislative subcommittee reviewing gun laws, at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, Conn. The Supreme Court said Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
November 12, 2019 - 10:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday that a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. The justices rejected an appeal from Remington Arms that argued it should be...
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November 12, 2019 - 9:56 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. The justices rejected an appeal from Remington Arms that argued it should be shielded by...
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November 12, 2019 - 9:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Tuesday a survivor and relatives of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting can pursue their lawsuit against the maker of the rifle used to kill 26 people. The justices rejected an appeal from Remington Arms that argued it should be shielded by...
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November 12, 2019 - 9:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is letting a lawsuit proceed against the maker of the rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. The justices rejected an appeal Tuesday from Remington Arms that argued a 2005 federal law shields firearms manufacturers from most lawsuits when their...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2018, file photo, thousands of people gather on the grounds of the Texas State Capitol during a "March for Our Lives" rally in Austin, Texas. The vast majority of mass shooters have acquired their firearms legally with nothing in their background that would have prohibited them from possessing a gun. But there have been examples of lapses in the background check system that allowed guns to end up in the wrong hands. Very few states also have a mechanism to seize firearms from someone who is not legally allowed to possess one.(Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP, File)
September 07, 2019 - 6:38 pm
Most mass shooters in the U.S. acquired the weapons they used legally because there was nothing in their backgrounds to disqualify them, according to James Alan Fox, a criminologist with Northeastern University who has studied mass shootings for decades. But in several attacks in recent years...
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