Salmon

JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, speaks with the Columbia River in the background near The Dalles, Oregon, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, where Celilo Falls, an ancient salmon fishing site was destroyed by the construction of the Dalles Dam in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
October 14, 2019 - 9:22 pm
THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — Two Pacific Northwest tribes on Monday demanded the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama and...
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JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, speaks with the Columbia River in the background near The Dalles, Oregon, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019, where Celilo Falls, an ancient salmon fishing site was destroyed by the construction of the Dalles Dam in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
October 14, 2019 - 6:38 pm
THE DALLES, Ore. (AP) — Two Pacific Northwest tribes on Monday demanded the removal of three major hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River to save migrating salmon and starving orcas and restore fishing sites that were guaranteed to the tribes in a treaty more than 150 years ago. The Yakama and...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 5:48 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
September 05, 2019 - 4:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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File - In this May 4, 2010, file photo, a sea lion tosses a partially eaten salmon in the Columbia River near Bonneville Dam, where six more sea lions were trapped earlier in the day with one to be euthanized, in North Bonneville, Wash. More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually in a nearly 300-mile stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. The National Marine Fisheries Service said Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, it's taking public comments on the plan requested by Idaho, Oregon, Washington and tribes in those states. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
August 30, 2019 - 5:32 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River on the Oregon-Washington border to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead, federal officials said Friday. The National Marine Fisheries Service said it's taking public comments...
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August 30, 2019 - 1:05 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than 1,100 sea lions could be killed annually along a stretch of the Columbia River to boost faltering populations of salmon and steelhead. Billions of dollars have been spent in Idaho, Oregon and Washington to save 13 species of Columbia Basin salmon and steelhead...
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August 23, 2019 - 5:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Add salmon to the list of species affected by Alaska's blistering summer temperatures, including the hottest July on record. Dead salmon have shown up in river systems throughout Alaska and the mortalities are probably connected to warm water or low river water levels, said...
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In this photo taken Monday, July 22, 2019, chinook salmon is seen after being unloaded at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. California fishermen are reporting one of the best salmon fishing seasons in more than a decade, thanks to heavy rain and snow that ended the state's historic drought. It's a sharp reversal for chinook salmon, also known as king salmon, an iconic fish that helps sustain many Pacific Coast fishing communities. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 22, 2019 - 7:43 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon. Reeling in a fish "feels good every time," but this year has been surprisingly good, said Bates, a...
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In this photo taken Monday, July 22, 2019, chinook salmon is seen after being unloaded at Fisherman's Wharf in San Francisco. California fishermen are reporting one of the best salmon fishing seasons in more than a decade, thanks to heavy rain and snow that ended the state's historic drought. It's a sharp reversal for chinook salmon, also known as king salmon, an iconic fish that helps sustain many Pacific Coast fishing communities. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 22, 2019 - 12:56 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon. Reeling in a fish "feels good every time," but this year has been surprisingly good, said Bates, a...
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In this Tuesday, July 16, 2019, drone photo released by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Gov. Mike Dunleavy, center rear, poses for photos in front of a Riv-Gen Power System turbine on the bank of the Kvichak River in Igiugig, Alaska. A tiny Alaska Native village is adopting an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a renewable energy source. (Amanda Byrd/ University Alaska Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 6:24 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A tiny Native village in southwest Alaska has turned to an emerging technology to transform the power of a local river into a sustainable energy source that's expected to free residents from dependency on costly diesel fuel. The village council in Igiugig is the first...
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