Religion and politics

FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2018, file photo, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints President Russell M. Nelson prays during the church's twice-annual conference, in Salt Lake City. Nelson has rolled out a dizzying number of policy changes during his first two years at the helm of the faith, leading to heightened anticipation for what he may announce at this weekend's church conference in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 05, 2019 - 2:03 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A high-ranking leader from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints urged members Saturday to adhere to the faith's law of chastity that forbids premarital sex despite mocking by others on social media. During a speech at a twice-annual church conference in Salt Lake...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2018, file photo, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints President Russell M. Nelson prays during the church's twice-annual conference, in Salt Lake City. Nelson has rolled out a dizzying number of policy changes during his first two years at the helm of the faith, leading to heightened anticipation for what he may announce at this weekend's church conference in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 05, 2019 - 1:50 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A high-ranking leader from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints urged members Saturday to adhere to the faith's law of chastity that forbids premarital sex despite mocking by others on social media. During a speech at a twice-annual church conference in Salt Lake...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019 file photo, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, takes questions from reporters as he arrives for votes on pending nominations, at the Capitol in Washington. Romney’s ratcheted-up rhetoric on President Donald Trump is again raising hopes among Trump detractors that the senator could play a key role in the unfolding impeachment saga, though the historic shifts in their relationship mean Romney’s next move is an open question. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 05, 2019 - 12:24 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In the hours after President Donald Trump called on China to investigate his political foe — plowing through another political guardrail — Democrats and Trump critics looked for signs that his party would slap him back. Seeking foreign help in an election is illegal. Who would...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019 file photo, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, takes questions from reporters as he arrives for votes on pending nominations, at the Capitol in Washington. Romney’s ratcheted-up rhetoric on President Donald Trump is again raising hopes among Trump detractors that the senator could play a key role in the unfolding impeachment saga, though the historic shifts in their relationship mean Romney’s next move is an open question. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 05, 2019 - 12:09 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In the hours after President Donald Trump called on China to investigate his political foe — plowing through another political guardrail — Democrats and Trump critics looked for signs that his party would slap him back. Seeking foreign help in an election is illegal. Who would...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019 file photo, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, takes questions from reporters as he arrives for votes on pending nominations, at the Capitol in Washington. Romney’s ratcheted-up rhetoric on President Donald Trump is again raising hopes among Trump detractors that the senator could play a key role in the unfolding impeachment saga, though the historic shifts in their relationship mean Romney’s next move is an open question. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
October 05, 2019 - 11:33 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In the hours after President Donald Trump called on China to investigate his political foe — plowing through another political guardrail — Democrats and Trump critics looked for signs that his party would slap him back. Seeking foreign help in an election is illegal. Who would...
Read More
October 05, 2019 - 11:21 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In the hours after President Donald Trump called on China to investigate his political foe — plowing through another political guardrail — Democrats and Trump critics looked for signs that his party would slap him back. Seeking foreign help in an election is illegal. Who would...
Read More
Anti-government protesters set fires and close a street during a demonstration in Baghdad, Iraq, Friday, Oct. 4, 2019. Security forces opened fire directly at hundreds of anti-government demonstrators in central Baghdad, killing some protesters and injuring dozens, hours after Iraq's top Shiite cleric warned both sides to end four days of violence "before it's too late." (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)
October 04, 2019 - 1:50 pm
BAGHDAD (AP) — Security forces opened fire directly at hundreds of anti-government demonstrators Friday in central Baghdad, killing at least 10 protesters and injuring dozens, hours after Iraq's top Shiite cleric warned both sides to end four days of violence "before it's too late." The deaths...
Read More
October 04, 2019 - 5:57 am
GURGAON, India (AP) — In a story Oct. 1 about the birth anniversary of Indian independence leader Mahatma Gandhi, The Associated Press erroneously reported that the Indian flag depicts Gandhi's spinning wheel. It is the Ashok Chakra, or wheel of Indian emperor Ashoka. The story also misidentified...
Read More
State District Judge Tammy Kemp gives former Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger a hug before Guyger leaves for jail, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Dallas. Guyger, who said she mistook neighbor Botham Jean's apartment for her own and fatally shot him in his living room, was sentenced to a decade in prison. (Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool)
October 03, 2019 - 5:53 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Judges don’t usually hug convicted murderers in the courtroom or hand them Bibles before sending them off to prison. That is what made Judge Tammy Kemp’s actions so extraordinary in the closing moments of the trial of a white former Dallas police officer who fatally shot her black...
Read More
State District Judge Tammy Kemp opens a Bible to John 3:16 before giving it to former Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger, left, before Guyger left for jail, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019, in Dallas. Guyger, who said she mistook neighbor Botham Jean's apartment for her own and fatally shot him in his living room, was sentenced to a decade in prison. (Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, Pool)
October 03, 2019 - 5:38 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Judges don’t usually hug convicted murderers in the courtroom or hand them Bibles before sending them off to prison. That is what made Judge Tammy Kemp’s actions so extraordinary in the closing moments of the trial of a white former Dallas police officer who fatally shot her black...
Read More

Pages