Regulatory agencies

FILE - In this May 11, 2015, file photo, nuclear waste is stored in underground containers at the Idaho Nation. A small amount of radioactive, weapons-grade plutonium about the size of a U.S. quarter is missing from an Idaho university that was using it for research, leading federal officials on Friday to propose an $8,500 fine. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Idaho State University can't account for about a 30th of an ounce (1 gram) of the material that's used in nuclear reactors and to make nuclear bombs. The plutonium was being used to develop ways to ensure nuclear waste containers weren't leaking and to find ways to detect radioactive material being illegally brought into the U.S. following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the school said in an email to the AP. (AP Photo/Keith Ridler, File)
May 04, 2018 - 7:43 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A small amount of radioactive, weapons-grade plutonium about the size of a U.S. quarter is missing from an Idaho university that was using it for research, leading federal officials on Friday to propose an $8,500 fine. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said Idaho State...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2018, file photo, Chinese and corporate flags fly in front of the offices of the Anbang Insurance Group in Beijing. The founder of the Chinese insurer that owns New York City's Waldorf Hotel went on trial Wednesday, March 28, 2018 on charges of fraud and abusing his position for personal benefit. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
March 28, 2018 - 1:55 am
BEIJING (AP) — The founder of the Chinese insurer that owns New York City's Waldorf Hotel went on trial Wednesday on charges of improperly raising billions of dollars from investors and abusing his position to benefit himself. Wu Xiaohui, chairman of Anbang Insurance Group, was detained last year...
Read More
Energy Secretary Rick Perry speaks at a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 16, 2018 - 5:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Russian government hacking operation aimed at the U.S. power grid did not compromise operations at any of the nation's power plants, federal regulators and the industry said Friday. Corporate networks at some of the 99 nuclear power plants licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory...
Read More
February 22, 2018 - 9:47 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China's insurance regulator is to take over management of insurer Anbang, owner of New York's famed Waldorf Astoria hotel. The move follows the indictment of the company's chairman on charges of economic crimes. The China Insurance Regulatory Commission said it would take over...
Read More
This 2011 photo provided by Greg Eubanks, CEO of an adoption agency in Washington state called WACAP, shows him surrounded by students from a community elementary school in Nairobi, Kenya. In 2018, Eubanks says his agency, and other U.S. adoption agencies dealing in international adoption, face difficulties ahead because of higher fees and tougher regulations being imposed by the U.S. State Department. (Courtesy Greg Eubanks via AP)
February 16, 2018 - 2:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. government has raised fees and made a series of regulatory changes recently for American families adopting children overseas, fueling resentment toward the State Department among agencies who fear further reductions in the already dwindling number of foreign adoptions. The...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2017 file photo, water flows through a break in the wall of the Oroville Dam spillway in Oroville, Calif. One year after the closest thing to disaster at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal dam regulators say they are looking hard at how they overlooked the built-in weaknesses of old dams like California's Oroville Dam for decades, and expect dam managers around the country to study their old dams and organizations equally hard. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)
February 11, 2018 - 12:18 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One year after the worst structural failures at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal regulators who oversee California's half-century-old, towering Oroville Dam say they are looking hard at how they overlooked its built-in weaknesses for decades. The Federal Energy...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2017 file photo, water flows through a break in the wall of the Oroville Dam spillway in Oroville, Calif. One year after the closest thing to disaster at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal dam regulators say they are looking hard at how they overlooked the built-in weaknesses of old dams like California's Oroville Dam for decades, and expect dam managers around the country to study their old dams and organizations equally hard. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)
February 11, 2018 - 11:44 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Federal dam regulators say they are looking hard at how they missed the built-in weaknesses of the nation's tallest dam. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission says in a letter sent late last month it wants owners of the 1,700 hydroelectric dams it regulates to look just as...
Read More

Pages