Redistricting

In this photo taken Wednesday, July 26, 2017 a member of the gallery tries to display her sign while lawmakers convene during a joint select committee meeting on redistricting in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina's nearly continuous legal battles this decade over how maps for state district boundaries are drawn don't end with a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision refusing to try to recalibrate boundaries to repair aggrieved political imbalances. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
June 29, 2019 - 10:36 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled federal courts aren't the place to settle partisan gerrymandering disputes, opponents of North Carolina's district maps are putting their hopes in state courts. An election reform group, the state Democratic Party and voters will go to...
Read More
In this photo taken Wednesday, July 26, 2017 a member of the gallery tries to display her sign while lawmakers convene during a joint select committee meeting on redistricting in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina's nearly continuous legal battles this decade over how maps for state district boundaries are drawn don't end with a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision refusing to try to recalibrate boundaries to repair aggrieved political imbalances. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
June 29, 2019 - 10:28 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Opponents of North Carolina's district maps are putting their hopes in state courts after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal courts aren't the place to settle partisan gerrymandering disputes. An election reform group, the state Democratic Party and voters will go to...
Read More
In this Aug. 13, 2001, file frame from video provided by C-SPAN, Tom Hofeller speaks during an event at the Republican National Committee in Washington. Hofeller, a mastermind of GOP redistricting preached keeping electronic records secure. But after his death in 2018, his own files found their way to the heart of lawsuits over a U.S. census question on citizenship and North Carolina’s legislative redistricting. (C-SPAN via AP)
June 28, 2019 - 4:38 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — During his long career drawing legislative maps designed to help Republicans, Tom Hofeller preached about the dangers of leaving digital fingerprints. As he advised in a 2011 presentation about redistricting strategies: "Make sure your computer is in a PRIVATE location," and "...
Read More
In this Aug. 13, 2001, file frame from video provided by C-SPAN, Tom Hofeller speaks during an event at the Republican National Committee in Washington. Hofeller, a mastermind of GOP redistricting preached keeping electronic records secure. But after his death in 2018, his own files found their way to the heart of lawsuits over a U.S. census question on citizenship and North Carolina’s legislative redistricting. (C-SPAN via AP)
June 28, 2019 - 2:14 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — During his long career drawing legislative maps designed to help Republicans, Tom Hofeller preached about the dangers of leaving digital fingerprints. As he advised in a 2011 presentation about redistricting strategies: "Make sure your computer is in a PRIVATE location," and "...
Read More
In this Aug. 13, 2001, file frame from video provided by C-SPAN, Tom Hofeller speaks during an event at the Republican National Committee in Washington. Hofeller, a mastermind of GOP redistricting preached keeping electronic records secure. But after his death in 2018, his own files found their way to the heart of lawsuits over a U.S. census question on citizenship and North Carolina’s legislative redistricting. (C-SPAN via AP)
June 28, 2019 - 2:08 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — During his long career drawing legislative maps designed to help Republicans, Tom Hofeller preached about the dangers of leaving digital fingerprints. As he advised in a 2011 presentation about redistricting strategies: "Make sure your computer is in a PRIVATE location," and "...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, April 11, 2019, file photo David Niven, a professor of political science at the University of Cincinnati, holds a map demonstrating a gerrymandered Ohio district in Cincinnati. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 28, 2019 - 1:20 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court declared that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. The ruling this week could empower Republicans and Democrats who...
Read More
FILE - In this April 1, 2019, file photo, Mindy Nagel poses for a photograph at the threshold of her home in Cincinnati. Nagel's home is split by two House districts. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 28, 2019 - 12:09 am
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. Thursday's ruling could empower Republicans and...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, March 19, 2019, file photo, political-science major Kylah Guion stands in the middle of Laurel Street in Greensboro, N.C. Gerrymandering has cut the campus of North Carolina A&T University in half, with this street as the dividing line between the 6th Congressional District on her left and the 13th District on her right, both represented by Republicans. With the Supreme Court saying it won’t get involved in partisan gerrymandering cases, experts say that may open the door to lawyers and politicians trying to redefine racial gerrymandering as partisan to escape judicial scrutiny. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed, File)
June 27, 2019 - 8:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When North Carolina drew its most recent political maps, state leaders split a historically black university in Greensboro into two congressional districts that critics say diluted the voting power of African Americans on campus. Lawmakers defended it as partisan gerrymandering —...
Read More
Demonstrators gather at the Supreme Court as the justices finish the term with key decisions on gerrymandering and a census case involving an attempt by the Trump administration to ask everyone about their citizenship status in the 2020 census, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 27, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 27, 2019 - 7:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When North Carolina drew its most recent political maps, state leaders split a historically black university in Greensboro into two congressional districts that critics say diluted the voting power of African Americans on campus. Lawmakers defended it as partisan gerrymandering —...
Read More
FILE - In this July 18, 2018, file photo, demonstrators rally outside the Michigan Hall of Justice in Lansing, Mich., where the state's Supreme Court heard arguments about whether voters in November should be able to pass a constitutional amendment that would change how the state's voting maps are drawn. The U.S. Supreme Court says it's up to the states to deal with partisan political mapmaking, and a number of them already are doing so with long-term redistricting reforms. (Dale G. Young/Detroit News via AP)
June 27, 2019 - 5:27 pm
While ruling that it had no authority to resolve partisan gerrymandering claims, the U.S. Supreme Court noted Thursday that states could act on their own to try to limit the role of politics in drawing congressional and state legislative districts. Several states already have done so, including...
Read More

Pages