Property damage

A house is destroyed in Lawrence, Mass., Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018 after a series of gas explosions in the area. First-responders continued to fight at least 50 fires in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover Mass., Thursday. The fires are being attributed to problems with the natural gas system and officials are urging residents to leave their homes if they smell gas. (Carl Russo/The Eagle-Tribune via AP)
September 14, 2018 - 3:59 am
LAWRENCE, Mass. (AP) — A series of gas explosions an official described as "Armageddon" killed a teenager, injured at least 10 other people and ignited fires in at least 39 homes in three communities north of Boston, forcing entire neighborhoods to evacuate as crews scrambled to fight the flames...
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Multiple fire trucks from surrounding communities arrive Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, in Lawrence, Mass., responding to a series of gas explosions and fires triggered by a problem with a gas line that feeds homes in several communities north of Boston. (AP Photo/Phil Marcelo)
September 13, 2018 - 11:21 pm
LAWRENCE, Mass. (AP) — A series of gas explosions an official described as "Armageddon" killed a teenager, injured at least 10 other people and ignited fires in at least 39 homes in three communities north of Boston on Thursday, forcing entire neighborhoods to evacuate as crews scrambled to fight...
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Firefighters battle a house fire, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, on Herrick Road in North Andover, Mass., one of multiple emergency crews responding to a series of gas explosions and fires triggered by a problem with a gas line that feeds homes in several communities north of Boston. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)
September 13, 2018 - 9:57 pm
LAWRENCE, Mass. (AP) — A series of gas explosions one official described as "Armageddon" left at least six people injured and ignited fires in at least 39 homes in three communities north of Boston on Thursday, forcing entire neighborhoods to evacuate as crews scrambled to fight the flames and turn...
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FILE- In this Aug. 22, 2018, file photo specialist Anthony Matesic, left, and trader Anthony Carannante work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The U.S. stock market opens at 9:30 a.m. EDT on Thursday, Sept. 13. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
September 13, 2018 - 2:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are climbing Thursday after the Labor Department said inflation slowed a bit in August. Technology companies like Apple and Microsoft made some of the largest gains after a recent bout of uncertainty, and chipmaker Qualcomm jumped after it announced a big stock buyback...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 5:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are parking cars in service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 4:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 3:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Caroline could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas and parts of Virginia, businesses are bracing for the...
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UPDATED WED 5 A.M. Map shows probable path of Hurricane Florence. ; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;
September 12, 2018 - 6:30 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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UPDATED WED 5 A.M. Map shows probable path of Hurricane Florence. ; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;
September 12, 2018 - 6:09 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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From left, Josh Clappsy, Blake Price, and JB Phillips remove boards from a dock in hopes to save it from rising waters in Swansboro, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Florence exploded into a potentially catastrophic hurricane Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds up to 140 mph (220 kph) and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 12, 2018 - 5:08 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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