Property damage

FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 5:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are parking cars in service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 4:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 3:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Caroline could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas and parts of Virginia, businesses are bracing for the...
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UPDATED WED 5 A.M. Map shows probable path of Hurricane Florence. ; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;
September 12, 2018 - 6:30 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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UPDATED WED 5 A.M. Map shows probable path of Hurricane Florence. ; 1c x 2 1/2 inches; 46.5 mm x 63 mm;
September 12, 2018 - 6:09 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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From left, Josh Clappsy, Blake Price, and JB Phillips remove boards from a dock in hopes to save it from rising waters in Swansboro, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Florence exploded into a potentially catastrophic hurricane Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds up to 140 mph (220 kph) and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 12, 2018 - 5:08 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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From left, Josh Clappsy, Blake Price, and JB Phillips remove boards from a dock in hopes to save it from rising waters in Swansboro, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Florence exploded into a potentially catastrophic hurricane Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds up to 140 mph (220 kph) and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 12, 2018 - 2:43 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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From left, Josh Clappsy, Blake Price, and JB Phillips remove boards from a dock in hopes to save it from rising waters in Swansboro, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Florence exploded into a potentially catastrophic hurricane Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds up to 140 mph (220 kph) and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 12, 2018 - 12:11 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Coastal residents fleeing a potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and drenching rain that could last for days. While some...
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Nick Hobbs, of Marine Warehouse Center, removes a customer's boat from the water in advance of Hurricane Florence in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. Florence exploded into a potentially catastrophic hurricane Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds up to 140 mph (220 kph) and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
September 11, 2018 - 11:43 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Florence (all times local): 8 p.m. ___ 7:30 p.m. The National Weather Service says more than 5.4 million people live in areas now under hurricane warnings or watches on the U.S. East Coast. Another 4 million people are under a tropical storm watch...
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FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2005, file photo, homes remain surrounded by floodwaters in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Some experts are concerned that Hurricane Florence could inflict damage comparable to 2005’s Hurricane Katrina in a part of the country that is famously difficult to evacuate, months after disaster planners simulated a Category 4 Hurricane strike alarmingly similar to the real-word scenario now unfolding on a stretch of the East Coast. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, Pool, File)
September 11, 2018 - 9:25 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Just months ago, disaster planners simulated a Category 4 hurricane strike alarmingly similar to the real-world scenario now unfolding on a dangerously vulnerable stretch of the East Coast. A fictional "Hurricane Cora" barreled into southeast Virginia and up the Chesapeake Bay to...
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