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Activists light candles in front of police officers in the Hambach forest in Kerben, western Germany, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018. To protest against the forest being chopped off for a lignite strip mine. (Oliver Berg/dpa via AP)
September 21, 2018 - 3:26 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German energy executive whose company plans to clear an ancient forest to expand a lignite strip mine says it's an "illusion" to think the woodland can be saved, and halting the project would cost his firm up to 5 billion euros ($5.9 billion). RWE wants to start cutting down half...
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Chicken farm buildings are inundated with floodwater from Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
September 18, 2018 - 11:24 pm
About 3.4 million chickens and turkeys and 5,500 hogs have been killed in flooding from Florence as rising North Carolina rivers swamped dozens of farm buildings where the animals were being raised for market, according to state officials. The N.C. Department of Agriculture issued the livestock...
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FILE - This 2010 file photo shows Exelon Corp.'s Oyster Creek Generating Station, a nuclear power plant in Lacey Township, N.J. America’s oldest nuclear power plant is shutting down Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. (Peter Ackerman/The Asbury Park Press via AP, File)
September 17, 2018 - 1:06 pm
LACEY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — America's oldest nuclear power plant has shut down as planned. Officials at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey say the plant went offline at noon Monday. Oyster Creek went online Dec. 1, 1969, the same day as the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Generating...
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September 14, 2018 - 7:05 pm
DENVER (AP) — The U.S. Interior Department said Friday it will go ahead with plans to open a wildlife refuge at the site of a former nuclear weapons plant in Colorado, after briefly putting the opening on hold amid concerns about public safety. Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge, on the perimeter...
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A work truck drives on Hwy 24 as the wind from Hurricane Florence blows palm trees in Swansboro N.C., Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Tom Copeland)
September 13, 2018 - 10:20 pm
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Florence (all times local): 10:15 p.m. A North Carolina TV news station has evacuated its building due to rising waters from Hurricane Florence. New Bern's WCTI-TV NewsChannel 12 posted on Facebook on Thursday night that employees had to abandon the...
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In this July 29, 2018 photo, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, left, Chris Pratt, center, and George Skarich, executive vice president of sales at Mid Continent Nail Corporation, walk through a shut down line at the Mid Continent Nail Corporation in Poplar Bluff, Mo. This nail production line was shut down by the company and some people were laid off because of tariffs. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
September 13, 2018 - 1:33 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The fate of a Missouri nail manufacturer suffering under President Donald Trump's steel tariffs has put Republican Senate candidate Josh Hawley in a bind between his support for the president's trade strategy and a local plant that says it could be forced to close. Mid...
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This enhanced satellite image made available by NOAA shows Hurricane Florence off the eastern coast of the United States on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018 at 5:52 p.m. EDT. (NOAA via AP)
September 13, 2018 - 10:56 am
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Florence (all times local): 10:45 a.m. Duke Energy Corp. is shutting down a coastal North Carolina nuclear power plant ahead of Hurricane Florence. The electricity provider says it began powering down one reactor early Thursday and would start...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 5:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are parking cars in service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 4:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Carolina could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas, Virginia and Georgia, businesses are bracing for the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, file photo a man walks out of the boarded up Robert's Grocery in Wrightsville Beach, N.C., in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Though it’s far from clear how much economic havoc Hurricane Florence will inflict on the southeastern coast, from South Carolina through Virginia, the damage won’t be easily or quickly overcome. In those states, critically important industries like tourism and agriculture are sure to suffer. “These storms can be very disruptive to regional economies, and it takes time for them to recover,” said Ryan Sweet, an economist at Moody’s Analytics. (Matt Born/The Star-News via AP, File)
September 12, 2018 - 3:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ports are closing. Farmers are moving hogs to high ground. Dealers are moving cars into service bays for refuge. And up to 3 million energy customers in North and South Caroline could lose power for weeks. Across the Carolinas and parts of Virginia, businesses are bracing for the...
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