Prisoner rights

FILE - In this July 8, 2010 file photo, teenagers head toward the gym at Caddo Juvenile Detention Center in Shreveport, La. Fear and frustration is raging as fast as the coronavirus in some juvenile detention centers, with riots and escapes reported in hotspot facilities such as New York and Louisiana. (Val Horvath/The Shreveport Times via AP, File)
May 02, 2020 - 10:35 pm
Nicole Hingle wasn’t surprised when the call came. Frustrations had been building inside juvenile detention centers nationwide as the number of coronavirus cases continued to climb. Now, her 17-year-old son Jace, was on the phone telling her around 40 kids had rioted at his facility in Louisiana —...
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FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2006, file photo a person drive through the gates of a federal prison in Oakdale, La. The federal Bureau of Prisons is locking all its 146,000 inmates in their cells for the next two weeks in an unparalleled effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus, as the focus shifts to the Louisiana compound, where two inmates have died and nearly 20 others remain hospitalized. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
April 13, 2020 - 12:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Prisoner rights advocates accused the federal Bureau of Prisons of “slow walking" the release of inmates at a Louisiana lockup where the coronavirus has killed six prisoners and infected dozens of others. The American Civil Liberties Union urged a federal judge on Monday to...
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This photo provided courtesy of the White family, shows U.S. Navy veteran Michael White, Thursday, March 19, 2020 in Mashhad, Iran. Two Americans imprisoned in the Middle East have been released. Iran has granted a medical furlough to U.S. Navy veteran Michael White as part of its efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus, and a Lebanese judge orderrs the release of Amer Fakhoury because more than 10 years had passed since the crimes he was accused of committing. (Courtesy of the White Family via AP)
March 19, 2020 - 7:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — An American jailed for months in Lebanon was released from custody Thursday, while a Navy veteran was granted medical furlough from an Iran prison as the country struggles to curb the spread of coronavirus, U.S. officials said. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that Michael...
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A man stands on the roof of the San Vittore prison during a protest in Milan, Italy, Monday, March 9, 2020. Italian penitentiary police say six inmates protesting virus containment measures at a northern Italian prison have died after they broke into the infirmary and overdosed on methadone. The protest Sunday in Modena was among the first of more than two-dozen riots at Italy’s overcrowded lock-ups that grew Monday. Human rights advocates have been warning that increasing tensions over fears of coronavirus were hitting inmates particularly hard, especially after restrictions were imposed on family visits to prevent transmissions. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
March 09, 2020 - 4:09 pm
ROME (AP) — Tensions in Italy's overcrowded prisons erupted Monday over new coronavirus containment measures, with riots in at least two dozen lock-ups and the deaths of six inmates who broke into an infirmary and overdosed on methadone. Italy's national prisoner rights advocate urged wardens to...
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A man stands on the roof of the San Vittore prison during a protest in Milan, Italy, Monday, March 9, 2020. Italian penitentiary police say six inmates protesting virus containment measures at a northern Italian prison have died after they broke into the infirmary and overdosed on methadone. The protest Sunday in Modena was among the first of more than two-dozen riots at Italy’s overcrowded lock-ups that grew Monday. Human rights advocates have been warning that increasing tensions over fears of coronavirus were hitting inmates particularly hard, especially after restrictions were imposed on family visits to prevent transmissions. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
March 09, 2020 - 12:17 pm
ROME (AP) — Tensions in Italy's overcrowded prisons erupted Monday over new coronavirus containment measures, with riots in at least two dozen lock-ups and the deaths of six inmates who broke into an infirmary and overdosed on methadone. Italy's national prisoner rights advocate urged wardens to...
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A man stands on the roof of the San Vittore prison during a protest in Milan, Italy, Monday, March 9, 2020. Italian penitentiary police say six inmates protesting virus containment measures at a northern Italian prison have died after they broke into the infirmary and overdosed on methadone. The protest Sunday in Modena was among the first of more than two-dozen riots at Italy’s overcrowded lock-ups that grew Monday. Human rights advocates have been warning that increasing tensions over fears of coronavirus were hitting inmates particularly hard, especially after restrictions were imposed on family visits to prevent transmissions. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
March 09, 2020 - 11:19 am
ROME (AP) — Tensions in Italy's overcrowded prisons erupted Monday over new coronavirus containment measures, with riots in at least two dozen lock-ups and the deaths of six inmates who broke into an infirmary and overdosed on methadone. Italy's national prisoner rights advocate urged wardens to...
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In this Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 photo, an Indian woman holds a candle and placard during a protest against the sedition case filed by police against a school after a play preformed by students denouncing a new citizenship law, in Bangalore, India. Critics, intellectuals, human rights activists, filmmakers, students and journalists in seen as opposed to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government are being increasingly silenced under a colonial-era sedition law. Official data reveal as many as 332 people were arrested under the law between 2016 and 2018, though only seven were convicted, suggesting that the police have struggled to gather evidence against the accused. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
March 06, 2020 - 5:07 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Sharjeel Imam was a little-known research scholar and a student activist until Indian police launched a manhunt across five states to nab him for a protest speech he gave calling for a month-long road blockade in the county's northeast. “Create debris on the railway tracks and...
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In this Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020 photo, an Indian woman holds a candle and placard during a protest against the sedition case filed by police against a school after a play preformed by students denouncing a new citizenship law, in Bangalore, India. Critics, intellectuals, human rights activists, filmmakers, students and journalists in seen as opposed to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government are being increasingly silenced under a colonial-era sedition law. Official data reveal as many as 332 people were arrested under the law between 2016 and 2018, though only seven were convicted, suggesting that the police have struggled to gather evidence against the accused. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)
March 06, 2020 - 2:14 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Sharjeel Imam was a little-known research scholar and a student activist until Indian police launched a manhunt across five states to nab him for a protest speech he gave calling for a month-long road blockade in the county's northeast. “Create debris on the railway tracks and...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 2:18 pm
LONDON (AP) — Truth-telling journalist or reckless criminal: A British judge was given two conflicting portraits of Julian Assange as the WikiLeaks founder's long-awaited extradition hearing began Monday in a London court. A lawyer for the U.S. authorities, who want to try Assange on espionage...
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This is a court artist sketch of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in the dock reading his papers as he appears at Belmarsh Magistrates' Court for his extradition hearing, in London, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. The U.S. government and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will face off Monday in a high-security London courthouse, a decade after WikiLeaks infuriated American officials by publishing a trove of classified military documents. (Elizabeth Cook/PA via AP)
February 24, 2020 - 11:48 am
LONDON (AP) — Truth-telling journalist or reckless criminal: A British judge was given two conflicting portraits of Julian Assange as the WikiLeaks founder's long-awaited extradition hearing began Monday in a London court. A lawyer for the U.S. authorities, who want to try Assange on espionage...
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