Prescription drug addiction

FILE - In this Tuesday, June 19, 2018 file photo Cheryl Juaire walks past a photo of her son, Corey Merrill, at her home in Marlborough, Mass. Victims of opioid addiction weren’t in the room when big decisions were hammered out in OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma’s proposal to settle claims over its role in the U.S. opioid crisis. Cheryl Juaire lost her 23-year-old son to a heroin overdose after he became addicted to prescription painkillers. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 06, 2019 - 3:50 pm
Victims of opioid addiction weren't in the room when OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma persuaded half the state attorneys general to settle claims over the company's role in the nationwide overdose epidemic. Now that Purdue is in federal bankruptcy court, four people whose lives were touched by...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, June 19, 2018 file photo Cheryl Juaire walks past a photo of her son, Corey Merrill, at her home in Marlborough, Mass. Victims of opioid addiction weren’t in the room when big decisions were hammered out in OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma’s proposal to settle claims over its role in the U.S. opioid crisis. Cheryl Juaire lost her 23-year-old son to a heroin overdose after he became addicted to prescription painkillers. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 06, 2019 - 11:58 am
Victims of opioid addiction weren't in the room when OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma persuaded half the state attorneys general to settle claims over the company's role in the nationwide overdose epidemic. Now that Purdue is in federal bankruptcy court, four people whose lives were touched by...
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September 05, 2019 - 2:44 pm
ROME (AP) — Italian authorities on Thursday suspended a doctor and three pharmacists in an investigation of the suspected fraudulent prescription of oxycodone, a potentially addictive painkiller. In allegations that appear to have similarities to the U.S. opioid addiction epidemic, a physician in...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 12:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a decade ago, the maker of OxyContin responded to a growing wave of opioid abuse by making the painkiller harder to snort and inject. But has that reformulation translated into fewer drug overdoses and deaths? It's a question that experts like Dr. Raeford Brown of the...
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This undated image provided by AcelRx Pharmaceuticals shows the dispenser and a tablet for the company's medication Dsuvia. On Friday, Nov. 2. 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. (Craig Sherod Photography/AcelRx Pharmaceuticals via AP)
November 02, 2018 - 3:29 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday approved a fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. The decision by the Food and Drug Administration came over objections from critics who fear the pill will be abused. In a lengthy statement, FDA...
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This undated image provided by AcelRx Pharmaceuticals shows the dispenser and a tablet for the company's medication Dsuvia. On Friday, Nov. 2. 2018, U.S. regulators announced the approval of the fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. (Craig Sherod Photography/AcelRx Pharmaceuticals via AP)
November 02, 2018 - 3:24 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday approved a fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. The decision by the Food and Drug Administration on Friday came over objections from critics who fear the pill will be abused. In a lengthy...
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George Barrett, left, executive chairman of the board, Cardinal Health, Inc., Dr. Joseph Mastandrea, chairman of the board, Miami-Luken, Inc., John Hammergren, chairman, president, and CEO, McKesson Corporation, J. Christopher Smith, former president and CEO, H.D. Smith Wholesale Drug Company, and Steven Collis, chairman, president, and CEO, AmerisourceBergen Corporation, are sworn in before they testify during a hearing of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, about the opioid epidemic, on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 08, 2018 - 3:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top executives of the nation's leading wholesale drug distributors told Congress under oath Tuesday that their companies didn't help cause the nation's deadly opioid epidemic, drawing bipartisan wrath that included one lawmaker suggesting prison terms for some company officials...
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In this image made from surveillance video provided Thursday, April 19, 2018, by the Carver County Sheriff's Office, as part of an investigative file into Prince's death, the superstar, center, enters a clinic of Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg on April 20, 2016, the day before he was found dead of an accidental fentanyl overdose. The doctor is not facing criminal charges and his attorney says he had no role in Prince's death. (Carver County Sheriff's Office via AP)
April 19, 2018 - 8:19 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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