Population growth and decline

December 30, 2019 - 12:25 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The past year’s population growth rate in the United States was the slowest in a century due to declining births, increasing deaths and the slowdown of international migration, according to figures released Monday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The U.S. grew from the middle of 2018...
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FILE - In a Monday, May 13, 2019 file photo, a red wolf roams its habitat at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C. Wildlife advocates have returned to court to prod the federal government to jump-start recovery efforts for the critically endangered red wolf, while North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper issued a sharply worded letter urging further action. Amid the pressure, federal biologists plan to transfer wolves from elsewhere into the recovery area for the first time in years to promote wild breeding. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
December 26, 2019 - 9:29 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The fight over the critically endangered red wolf has returned to court as North Carolina's governor sought immediate help for the dozen or so remaining in the wild and federal biologists planned to transfer wolves into the recovery area for the first time in years. In late...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2017 file photo a lifeguard scans a crowded shoreline at Manhattan Beach, Calif. California's population has stalled at 39 million people. An estimate released Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, showed the state had 39.96 million people as of July 1. (AP Photo/John Antczak,File)
December 20, 2019 - 2:30 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's population has stalled at 39.9 million people as expensive housing prices and other factors convince more people to leave the state for other parts of the country. An estimate released Friday showed California added 141,300 people from July 1, 2018, to July 1...
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December 20, 2019 - 1:26 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's population has stalled at 39 million people as the state's growth rate slows because of more people leaving the state for other parts of the country. An estimate released Friday showed California added 141,300 people from July 1, 2018, to July 1, 2019,...
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In this Dec. 14, 2019, photo, Dr. Psyche Calderon works with a patient in a shelter for migrants in Tijuana, Mexico. Calderon is a general practitioner volunteering her time to provide care for Central Americans stuck in Mexico while they try to obtain asylum in the United States. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
December 18, 2019 - 2:56 pm
TIJUANA, Mexico (AP) — When the Honduran boy complained of a toothache, Dr. Psyche Calderon asked the obvious question: “When did the pain start?" The answer broke her heart. “When La Mara broke all my teeth and killed all my family," the 14-year-old said. He said little else about the attack by...
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In this Oct. 17, 2019, photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a pile of recently dead freshwater mussels are piled along the shore of the Clinch River near Wallen Bend, Tenn. While freshwater mussels have been plagued for decades by habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, sedimentation and other issues, there's a possibility that the die-off in the Clinch River could be connected to infectious disease. (Meagan Racey/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
December 17, 2019 - 1:17 am
KYLES FORD, Tenn. (AP) — On a recent late fall afternoon at Kyles Ford, the white branches of sycamore trees overhung the banks of the Clinch River, leaves slowly turning yellow. Green walnuts covered the ground. The shallow water ran fast and cold over the rocky bottom, but it was littered with...
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In this Oct. 17, 2019, photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a pile of recently dead freshwater mussels are piled along the shore of the Clinch River near Wallen Bend, Tenn. While freshwater mussels have been plagued for decades by habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, sedimentation and other issues, there's a possibility that the die-off in the Clinch River could be connected to infectious disease. (Meagan Racey/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
December 17, 2019 - 1:07 am
KYLES FORD, Tenn. (AP) — On a recent late fall afternoon at Kyles Ford, the white branches of sycamore trees overhung the banks of the Clinch River, leaves slowly turning yellow. Green walnuts covered the ground. The shallow water ran fast and cold over the rocky bottom, but it was littered with...
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Reuben Panchol is shown Friday, Dec. 6, 2019 at the North Dakota state capitol in Bismarck. Panchol, who immigrated from Sudan to North Dakota as a child, says he hopes to tell his personal story at a meeting Monday, Dec. 9 at which the Burleigh County Commission may vote against accepting any new refugees. It's believed the county would be the first to do so since President Donald Trump's executive order earlier this fall gave states and counties the ability to do so. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)
December 08, 2019 - 1:29 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Reuben Panchol was forced to leave war-torn Sudan decades ago as a child, embarking on an odyssey that eventually brought him to the American Midwest and left him eternally grateful to the country that took him in. “I am an American citizen, a North Dakotan,” said Panchol, a...
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FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2019, file photo people stand in line to inquire about jobs available at the Bean Automotive Group during a job fair designed for people fifty years or older in Miami. On Wednesday, Dec. 4, payroll processor ADP reports on how many jobs its survey estimates U.S. companies added in November. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
December 04, 2019 - 9:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. companies added just 67,000 jobs in November, a private survey found, barely half the gain of the previous month. Payroll processor ADP said that manufacturers, construction firms and mining companies cut 18,000 jobs combined. Companies with fewer than 20 employees also...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
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